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The relationship between engineering bachelor qualifications and occupational status in Australia

Palmer, S., Tolson, M., Young, K. and Campbell, M. 2015, The relationship between engineering bachelor qualifications and occupational status in Australia, Australasian journal of engineering education, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 103-112, doi: 10.1080/22054952.2015.1092666.

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Title The relationship between engineering bachelor qualifications and occupational status in Australia
Author(s) Palmer, S.ORCID iD for Palmer, S. orcid.org/0000-0002-2517-0597
Tolson, M.
Young, K.
Campbell, M.ORCID iD for Campbell, M. orcid.org/0000-0001-5865-2966
Journal name Australasian journal of engineering education
Volume number 20
Issue number 2
Start page 103
End page 112
Total pages 10
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1325-4340
Keyword(s) STEM
engineering education
Australian census
educational qualifications
occupational outcomes
Summary Internationally, the importance of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) for innovation and competition drives concerns about the adequacy of national STEM workforces. Data from the UK, USA and Australia suggest that, even immediately post-graduation, a significant proportion of engineering bachelor graduates do not work in engineering roles. Using the 2011 Australian census data, we present an investigation into the relationship between educational qualifications and occupational status of Australian engineering bachelor graduates, and how this status varies specifically with graduate age. We consider the implications of these findings and present recommendations for the recruitment and education of Australian engineering undergraduates. We conclude that engineering students would be better informed about, and equipped for, the world of post-graduation work if they were exposed to the likely options for their career trajectory. Likewise, secondary school students and others considering engineering undergraduate study would be more honestly advised if they were informed about the full range of career possibilities for engineering graduates and the probability that they are just as likely to work out of engineering as in it.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/22054952.2015.1092666
Field of Research 091503 Engineering Practice
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Engineers Australia
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080019

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.