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What are the perceived learning needs of Australian general practice registrars for quality prescribing?

Ajjawi, Rola, Thistlethwaite, Jill E., Aslani, Parisa and Cooling, Nick B. 2010, What are the perceived learning needs of Australian general practice registrars for quality prescribing?, BMC medical education, vol. 10, Article Number : 92, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/1472-6920-10-92.

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Title What are the perceived learning needs of Australian general practice registrars for quality prescribing?
Author(s) Ajjawi, RolaORCID iD for Ajjawi, Rola orcid.org/0000-0003-0651-3870
Thistlethwaite, Jill E.
Aslani, Parisa
Cooling, Nick B.
Journal name BMC medical education
Volume number 10
Season Article Number : 92
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1472-6920
Summary BACKGROUND: Little is known about the perceived learning needs of Australian general practice (GP) registrars in relation to the quality use of medicines (QUM) or the difficulties experienced when learning to prescribe. This study aimed to address this gap. METHODS: GP registrars' perceived learning needs were investigated through an online national survey, interviews and focus groups. Medical educators' perceptions were canvassed in semi-structured interviews in order to gain a broader perspective of the registrars' needs. Qualitative data analysis was informed by a systematic framework method involving a number of stages. Survey data were analysed descriptively. RESULTS: The two most commonly attended QUM educational activities took place in the workplace and through regional training providers. Outside of these structured educational activities, registrars learned to prescribe mainly through social and situated means. Difficulties encountered by GP registrars included the transition from hospital prescribing to prescribing in the GP context, judging how well they were prescribing and identifying appropriate and efficient sources of information at the point of care. CONCLUSIONS: GP registrars learn to prescribe primarily and opportunistically in the workplace. Despite many resources being expended on the provision of guidelines, decision-support systems and training, GP registrars expressed difficulties related to QUM. Ways of easing the transition into GP and of managing the information 'overload' related to medicines (and prescribing) in an evidence-guided, efficient and timely manner are needed. GP registrars should be provided with explicit feedback about the process and outcomes of prescribing decisions, including the use of audits, in order to improve their ability to judge their own prescribing.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-10-92
Field of Research 130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy
130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080024

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.