You are not logged in.

All in the blood: a review of Aboriginal Australians' cultural beliefs about blood and implications for biospecimen research

Kowal, Emma, Greenwood, Ashley and McWhirter, Rebekah E. 2015, All in the blood: a review of Aboriginal Australians' cultural beliefs about blood and implications for biospecimen research, Journal of empirical research on human research ethics, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 347-359, doi: 10.1177/1556264615604521.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title All in the blood: a review of Aboriginal Australians' cultural beliefs about blood and implications for biospecimen research
Author(s) Kowal, EmmaORCID iD for Kowal, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-3866-3224
Greenwood, Ashley
McWhirter, Rebekah E.
Journal name Journal of empirical research on human research ethics
Volume number 10
Issue number 4
Start page 347
End page 359
Total pages 13
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-10
ISSN 1556-2654
Keyword(s) Aboriginal
biospecimen
blood
culture
ethics
indigenous
Social Sciences
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medical Ethics
Social Sciences - Other Topics
INDIGENOUS HEALTH RESEARCH
GENETIC RESEARCH
COMMUNITY
DONATION
PROJECT
PEOPLE
PARTICIPATION
PERSPECTIVES
RECRUITMENT
CHALLENGES
Summary Public participation in medical research and biobanking is considered key to advances in scientific discovery and translation to improved health care. Cultural concerns relating to blood have been found to affect the participation of indigenous peoples and minorities in research, but such concerns are rarely specified in the literature. This article presents a review of the role of blood in Australian Aboriginal cultures. We discuss the range of meanings and uses of blood in traditional culture, including their use in ceremonies, healing, and sorcery. We draw on more recent literature on Aboriginal Australians and biomedicine to consider how traditional beliefs may be changing over time. These findings provide an empirical basis for researchers and bioethicists to develop culturally grounded strategies to boost the participation of Aboriginal Australians in biomedical research. They also serve as a model for integrating anthropological literature with bioethical concerns that could be applied to other indigenous and minority groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1556264615604521
Field of Research 2201 Applied Ethics
160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology
160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Sage
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080078

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 132 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 04 Dec 2015, 12:11:47 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.