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Expanding the Australian empire?: the Australian Council for the World Council of Churches, the Menzies Government and the New Hebrides in the late 1950s

Waters, Christopher 2015, Expanding the Australian empire?: the Australian Council for the World Council of Churches, the Menzies Government and the New Hebrides in the late 1950s, Journal of religious history, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.1111/1467-9809.12306.

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Title Expanding the Australian empire?: the Australian Council for the World Council of Churches, the Menzies Government and the New Hebrides in the late 1950s
Author(s) Waters, Christopher
Journal name Journal of religious history
Volume number 40
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0022-4227
1467-9809
Keyword(s) Australian empire
Menzies government
World council of churches
Religious history
Summary In the late 1950s the Australian Council for the World Council of Churches (AC-WCC) inspired primarily by the Presbyterian Church, undertook a concerted campaign to pressure the Australian government to assume a greater role in the affairs of the New Hebrides. The AC-WCC wanted the Australian government to take over the United Kingdom's role in the administration of the Anglo-French Condominium. It was motivated to undertake this campaign by the dismal social and economic conditions in the islands, the neglect of the British and French colonial authorities, and their failure to offer the indigenous people a way forward to self-government. The high point of the campaign was a meeting between Robert Menzies, the Australian prime minister and a delegation from the AC-WCC in early 1958. As a result of this meeting Australian ministers and officials, for the final time, gave extended consideration to expanding Australia's empire in the South Pacific to include the New Hebrides. This article examines the AC-WCC's campaign, explores the Australian government's response, and analyses the outcome of this important episode in Australia's involvement in the colonial territories of the South Pacific.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1467-9809.12306
Field of Research 210303 Australian History (excl Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)
210313 Pacific History (excl New Zealand and Maori)
2103 Historical Studies
2204 Religion And Religious Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970121 Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080098

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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