You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Itinerant foreign harvest workers in Australia: the impact of precarious employment on occupational safety and health

Underhill, Elsa and Rimmer, Malcolm 2015, Itinerant foreign harvest workers in Australia: the impact of precarious employment on occupational safety and health, Policy and practice in health and safety, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 25-46.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
underhill-itinerantforeign-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 351.52KB 482

Title Itinerant foreign harvest workers in Australia: the impact of precarious employment on occupational safety and health
Author(s) Underhill, ElsaORCID iD for Underhill, Elsa orcid.org/0000-0002-3931-2867
Rimmer, Malcolm
Journal name Policy and practice in health and safety
Volume number 13
Issue number 2
Start page 25
End page 46
Total pages 22
Publisher Institution of Occupational Safety and Health
Place of publication Leicester, Eng.
Publication date 2015-12-02
ISSN 1366-1965
1477-4003
Keyword(s) Backpackers
contracting, horticulture
occupational health and safety
payment systems
temporary migrants
undocumented workers
young workers
Summary Horticulture work in many high-income economies is increasingly performed by temporary migrant workers from low-wage economies. In Australia, such work is now performed predominantly by international backpackers – young well-educated workers with mostly sound English language skills. These workers are drawn to harvesting work by a government scheme which provides an incentive for completing a specified number of days work in horticulture. This article examines the health and safety experience of these workers, through focus groups, interviews and an online survey. Notwithstanding their distinctive backgrounds, the harvesting experience of these temporary migrant workers is similar to that of low-skilled migrants working in other high-income countries. Health and safety risks associated with work organisation and payment systems, and a lack of compliance with OHS legal requirements, are commonplace but potentially compounded by a sense of invincibility amongst these young travellers. Furthermore, a growing pool of undocumented workers is placing downward pressures on their employment conditions. The vulnerability associated with work and earnings uncertainty, and the harsh environment in which harvesting work occurs, remains a constant notwithstanding the background of these workers.
Language eng
Field of Research 150306 Industrial Relations
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 910401 Industrial Relations
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Institution of Occupational Safety and Health
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080149

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 235 Abstract Views, 483 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 08 Dec 2015, 13:58:03 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.