Examining the cognitive and affective trust-based mechanisms underlying the relationship between ethical leadership and organisational citizenship: A case of the head leading the heart?

Newman, Alexander, Kiazad, Kohyar, Miao, Qing and Cooper, Brian 2013, Examining the cognitive and affective trust-based mechanisms underlying the relationship between ethical leadership and organisational citizenship: A case of the head leading the heart?, Journal of business ethics, vol. 123, pp. 113-123, doi: 10.1007/s10551-013-1803-2.

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Title Examining the cognitive and affective trust-based mechanisms underlying the relationship between ethical leadership and organisational citizenship: A case of the head leading the heart?
Author(s) Newman, AlexanderORCID iD for Newman, Alexander orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-8947
Kiazad, Kohyar
Miao, Qing
Cooper, Brian
Journal name Journal of business ethics
Volume number 123
Start page 113
End page 123
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Ann Arbor, Mich
Publication date 2013-07-18
ISSN 0167-4544
1573-0697
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Business
Ethics
Business & Economics
Social Sciences - Other Topics
Ethical leadership
Organisational citizenship behaviour
Social exchange
Trust
SOCIAL-EXCHANGE
BEHAVIOR
PERFORMANCE
MODEL
Summary In this paper, we investigate the trust-based mechanisms underlying the relationship between ethical leadership and followers' organisational citizenship behaviours (OCBs). Based on three-wave survey data obtained from 184 employees and their supervisors, we find that ethical leadership leads to higher levels of both affective and cognitive trust. In addition, we find support for a three-path mediational model, where cognitive trust and affective trust, in turn, mediate the relationship between ethical leadership and follower OCBs. That is to say, we found that ethical leadership leads to the development of cognitive trust, which subsequently influences the development of affective trust. Affective trust, in turn, induces followers to exhibit OCBs as a means of reciprocating the leader's favourable behaviour. Our findings suggest that both affective and cognitive trust plays an important role in the social exchange processes that underlie the relationship between ethical leadership and the discretionary behaviour of followers. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10551-013-1803-2
Field of Research 150310 Organisation and Management Theory
1503 Business And Management
2201 Applied Ethics
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080210

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Department of Management
2018 ERA Submission
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