You are not logged in.

The relationship between ethical leadership and unethical pro-organizational behavior: linear or curvilinear effects?

Miao, Qing, Newman, Alexander, Yu, Jin and Xu, Lin 2013, The relationship between ethical leadership and unethical pro-organizational behavior: linear or curvilinear effects?, Journal of business ethics, vol. 116, no. 3, pp. 641-653.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The relationship between ethical leadership and unethical pro-organizational behavior: linear or curvilinear effects?
Author(s) Miao, Qing
Newman, Alexander
Yu, Jin
Xu, Lin
Journal name Journal of business ethics
Volume number 116
Issue number 3
Start page 641
End page 653
Total pages 13
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Ann Arbor, Mich
Publication date 2013-09-01
ISSN 0167-4544
1573-0697
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Business
Ethics
Business & Economics
Social Sciences - Other Topics
Curvilinear relationship
Ethical leadership
Identification with supervisor
Social exchange theory
Social learning theory
Unethical pro-organizational behavior
CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT
TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP
IDENTIFICATION
SELF
IDENTITY
MODEL
CITIZENSHIP
PERSPECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
CLIMATE
Summary In this study, we examine the nature of the relationship between ethical leadership and unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB), defined as unethical behavior conducted by employees with the aim of benefiting their organization, and whether the strength of the relationship differs between subordinates experiencing high and low identification with supervisor. Based on three-wave survey data obtained from 239 public sector employees in China, we find that ethical leadership has an inverted u-shaped (curvilinear) relationship with UPB. As the level of ethical leadership increases from low to moderate, UPB increases; as the level of ethical leadership increases from moderate to high, UPB decreases. Further, we find that the strength of this inverted u-curve relationship differs between subordinates with high and low identification with supervisor. That is to say, the inverted u-shaped relationship between ethical leadership and UPB was stronger when subordinates experienced high levels of identification with supervisor. The theoretical and managerial implications of our findings for understanding how to manage UPB in an organizational context are discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Language eng
Field of Research 150310 Organisation and Management Theory
1503 Business And Management
2201 Applied Ethics
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080240

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Management
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 193 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 14 Dec 2015, 10:45:45 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.