You are not logged in.

Experimental investigation on bonding properties of reactive liquid rubber epoxy in CFRP retrofitted concretet members

Baiuk, Amad-Adeen, Al-Ameri, Riyadh and Fox, Bronwyn 2015, Experimental investigation on bonding properties of reactive liquid rubber epoxy in CFRP retrofitted concretet members, in FRPRCS-12 & APFIS 2015 : Proceedings of The 12th International Symposium on Fiber Reinforced Polymers for Reinforced Concrete Structures & The 5th Asia-Pacific Conference on Fiber Reinforced Polymers in Structures, Southeast University, Nanjing, China, pp. 1-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Experimental investigation on bonding properties of reactive liquid rubber epoxy in CFRP retrofitted concretet members
Author(s) Baiuk, Amad-Adeen
Al-Ameri, RiyadhORCID iD for Al-Ameri, Riyadh orcid.org/0000-0003-1881-1787
Fox, Bronwyn
Conference name Fiber Reinforced Polymers for Reinforced Concrete Structures & Asia-Pacific Conference on Fiber Reinforced Polymers in Structures. Joint Conference (2015 : Nanjing, China)
Conference location Nanjing, China
Conference dates 14-16 Dec. 2015
Title of proceedings FRPRCS-12 & APFIS 2015 : Proceedings of The 12th International Symposium on Fiber Reinforced Polymers for Reinforced Concrete Structures & The 5th Asia-Pacific Conference on Fiber Reinforced Polymers in Structures
Editor(s) Wu, Zhishen
Wu, Gang
Wang, Xin
Publication date 2015
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Southeast University
Place of publication Nanjing, China
Summary The load bearing capacity of aging reinforced concrete structures, such as bridges, is increasingly extended with the use of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP). Premature failure, which is attributed to the rigid behaviour of the bonding agent (epoxy resin) and the high stresses at the interface region, can occur because of the debonding of CFRP sheets from host surfaces. To overcome the debonding issue, the epoxy resin is modified by different reactive liquid polymers to improve its toughness, flexibility, adhesion, and impact resistance. This study reports the usage of two reactive liquid polymers, namely, liquid Carboxyl-Terminated Butadiene-Acrylonitrile (CTBN) and liquid Amine-Terminated Butadiene-Acrylonitrile (ATBN), to improve the mechanical properties of the commercially available MBrace saturant resin when added to a ratio of 100:30 by weight. The neat and modified epoxies were analysed using the Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) to determine and compare the storage modulus and glass transition temperatures of these materials. Moreover, the bonding strength of neat and modified epoxies was evaluated through single-lap shear tests on CFRP sheets bonded to concrete prisms. The results indicate that the modified resins exhibited improved ductility and toughness and became reasonably flexible compared with the neat epoxy resin. The improved properties will help delay the premature debonding failure in CFRP retrofitted concrete members.
Language eng
Field of Research 090506 Structural Engineering
091202 Composite and Hybrid Materials
Socio Economic Objective 870201 Civil Construction Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, Southeast University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080303

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Engineering
Institute for Frontier Materials
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 105 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 18 Apr 2016, 11:01:47 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.