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Sustainable schools as pedagogical tools for environmental education

Tucker, Richard and Izadpanahi, Parisa 2015, Sustainable schools as pedagogical tools for environmental education, in ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 75-84.

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Title Sustainable schools as pedagogical tools for environmental education
Author(s) Tucker, RichardORCID iD for Tucker, Richard orcid.org/0000-0001-9989-251X
Izadpanahi, Parisa
Conference name Architectural Science Association. International Conference (49th : 2015 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 2-4 Dec. 2015
Title of proceedings ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association
Editor(s) Crawford, R. H.
Stephan, A.
Publication date 2015
Start page 75
End page 84
Total pages 10
Publisher University of Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) sustainably designed schools
conventional schools
children's environmental awareness
Summary There has been extensive research about the association between school physical environment and children’s educational performance. However, the relationship between the sustainability of school physical environments and children’s environmental awareness via education has been rarely addressed in the literature. This paper evaluates the possible differences between the environmental attitudes and behaviours of children in schools designed for sustainability and conventional schools in Victoria, Australia. The New Environmental Paradigm (NEP) and General Ecological Behaviours (GEB) scales were employed to measure the environmental awareness of 275 grade 4-6 children in seven primary schools. Quantitative analysis was conducted to look for significant differences between the environmental attitudes and behaviours of two groups: children attending conventional schools and children attending schools assessed as being designed or refurbished with sustainability in mind. The results of the analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Factor analysis revealed the NEP and GEB to be multidimensional scales. Considering the relationship between school design and the identified behaviour and attitude factors showed the presence of sustainability features had the greatest impact on the factor Children’s Attitudes via ESD (Environmentally Sustainable Design) at School. This result invites professionals in the built environment design disciplines to re-think the pedagogic importance of environmentally sustainable design in schools.
ISBN 9780992383527
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
050203 Environmental Education and Extension
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Melbourne
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080319

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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