The use of Integral Theory to evaluate architectural sustainability - a case study

Roetzel, Astrid, Fuller, Robert, Rajagopalan, Priya and Luther, Mark 2015, The use of Integral Theory to evaluate architectural sustainability - a case study, in ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 598-610.

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Title The use of Integral Theory to evaluate architectural sustainability - a case study
Author(s) Roetzel, AstridORCID iD for Roetzel, Astrid orcid.org/0000-0003-3243-7744
Fuller, Robert
Rajagopalan, Priya
Luther, MarkORCID iD for Luther, Mark orcid.org/0000-0002-9677-7636
Conference name Architectural Science Association. International Conference (49th : 2015 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 2-4 Dec. 2015
Title of proceedings ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association
Editor(s) Crawford, R. H.
Stephan, A.
Publication date 2015
Start page 598
End page 610
Total pages 13
Publisher University of Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) sustainability
assessment
Integral Theory
Summary DeKay’s concept of Integral Sustainable Design (ISD) is based on Integral Theory, a framework proposed by the American philosopher, Ken Wilber. It offers four simultaneous perspectives (represented by quadrants) which each take a different view of the problem. The ‘experiences’ quadrant focuses on individual human experiences. The ‘behaviours’ quadrant looks at environmental performance. The ‘cultures’ perspective focuses on the collective interpretation of meaning, symbolism and worldviews and the ‘systems’ quadrant investigates the response and interaction with context. Integral Theory can act as a reminder for architects of the different perspectives that a sustainable building should address. In order to evaluate ISD, the Waterfront Campus Building of Deakin University has been used as a case study. The building, its performance, impact and perception, has been evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative data. Two surveys have been conducted to gather qualitative data to: (i) determine the experience of building users (staff and students) and (ii) the perception of non-users (Geelong residents and tourists). Data from building services and a site analysis has enabled quantitative assessments to be made. These inputs have been analysed, guided by ISD, to evaluate the usefulness of ISD as a sustainability assessment tool.
ISBN 9780992383527
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Melbourne
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080332

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