Comparison of a traditional and non-traditional residential care facility for persons living with dementia and the impact of the environment on occupational engagement

Richards, Kieva, D'Cruz, Rachel, Harman, Suzanne and Stagnitti, Karen 2015, Comparison of a traditional and non-traditional residential care facility for persons living with dementia and the impact of the environment on occupational engagement, Australian occupational therapy journal, vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 438-448, doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12243.

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Title Comparison of a traditional and non-traditional residential care facility for persons living with dementia and the impact of the environment on occupational engagement
Author(s) Richards, KievaORCID iD for Richards, Kieva orcid.org/0000-0003-0904-2031
D'Cruz, Rachel
Harman, Suzanne
Stagnitti, KarenORCID iD for Stagnitti, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-6215-3390
Journal name Australian occupational therapy journal
Volume number 62
Issue number 6
Start page 438
End page 448
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 0045-0766
1440-1630
Keyword(s) dementia
environmental design
non-traditional
occupational engagement
residential facility
Summary BACKGROUND: Dementia residential facilities can be described as traditional or non-traditional facilities. Non-traditional facilities aim to utilise principles of environmental design to create a milieu that supports persons experiencing cognitive decline. This study aimed to compare these two environments in rural Australia, and their influence on residents' occupational engagement. METHODS: The Residential Environment Impact Survey (REIS) was used and consists of: a walk-through of the facility; activity observation; interviews with residents and employees. Thirteen residents were observed and four employees interviewed. Resident interviews did not occur given the population diagnosis of moderate to severe dementia. Descriptive data from the walk-through and activity observation were analysed for potential opportunities of occupational engagement. Interviews were thematically analysed to discern perception of occupational engagement of residents within their facility. RESULTS: Both facilities provided opportunities for occupational engagement. However, the non-traditional facility provided additional opportunities through employee interactions and features of the physical environment. Interviews revealed six themes: Comfortable environment; roles and responsibilities; getting to know the resident; more stimulation can elicit increased engagement; the home-like experience and environmental layout. These themes coupled with the features of the environment provided insight into the complexity of occupational engagement within this population. CONCLUSION: This study emphasises the influence of the physical and social environment on occupational engagement opportunities. A non-traditional dementia facility maximises these opportunities and can support development of best-practice guidelines within this population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12243
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Occupational Therapy Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080342

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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