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A single-blind, randomised controlled trial on the effects of lithium and quetiapine monotherapy on the trajectory of cognitive functioning in first episode mania: A 12-month follow-up study

Daglas, R., Cotton, S. M., Allott, K., Yücel, M., Macneil, C. A., Hasty, M. K., Murphy, B., Pantelis, C., Hallam, K. T., Henry, L. P., Conus, P., Ratheesh, A., Kader, L., Wong, M. T., McGorry, P. D. and Berk, Michael 2016, A single-blind, randomised controlled trial on the effects of lithium and quetiapine monotherapy on the trajectory of cognitive functioning in first episode mania: A 12-month follow-up study, European psychiatry, vol. 31, pp. 20-28, doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.09.460.

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Title A single-blind, randomised controlled trial on the effects of lithium and quetiapine monotherapy on the trajectory of cognitive functioning in first episode mania: A 12-month follow-up study
Author(s) Daglas, R.
Cotton, S. M.
Allott, K.
Yücel, M.
Macneil, C. A.
Hasty, M. K.
Murphy, B.
Pantelis, C.
Hallam, K. T.
Henry, L. P.
Conus, P.
Ratheesh, A.
Kader, L.
Wong, M. T.
McGorry, P. D.
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name European psychiatry
Volume number 31
Start page 20
End page 28
Total pages 9
Publisher Elesvier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1778-3585
Keyword(s) Bipolar disorder
Cognition
Early intervention
Lithium
Mania
Quetiapine
Summary BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits have been reported during the early stages of bipolar disorder; however, the role of medication on such deficits remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of lithium and quetiapine monotherapy on cognitive performance in people following first episode mania. METHODS: The design was a single-blind, randomised controlled trial on a cohort of 61 participants following first episode mania. Participants received either lithium or quetiapine monotherapy as maintenance treatment over a 12-month follow-up period. The groups were compared on performance outcomes using an extensive cognitive assessment battery conducted at baseline, month 3 and month 12 follow-up time-points. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction between group and time in phonemic fluency at the 3-month and 12-month endpoints, reflecting greater improvements in performance in lithium-treated participants relative to quetiapine-treated participants. After controlling for multiple comparisons, there were no other significant interactions between group and time for other measures of cognition. CONCLUSION: Although the effects of lithium and quetiapine treatment were similar for most cognitive domains, the findings imply that early initiation of lithium treatment may benefit the trajectory of cognition, specifically verbal fluency in young people with bipolar disorder. Given that cognition is a major symptomatic domain of bipolar disorder and has substantive effects on general functioning, the ability to influence the trajectory of cognitive change is of considerable clinical importance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.09.460
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080419

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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