You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use among Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative comparative study

Alzubaidi, H., Mc Namara, K., Browning, Colette and Marriott, J. 2015, Barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use among Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative comparative study, BMJ Open, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008687.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mcnamara-barriersandenablers-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 5.72MB 16

Title Barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use among Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative comparative study
Author(s) Alzubaidi, H.
Mc Namara, K.ORCID iD for Mc Namara, K. orcid.org/0000-0001-6547-9153
Browning, Colette
Marriott, J.
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 5
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY
PUBLIC HEALTH
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
Summary OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore the decision-making processes and associated barriers and enablers that determine access and use of healthcare services in Arabic-speaking and English-speaking Caucasian patients with diabetes in Australia. STUDY SETTING AND DESIGN: Face-to-face semistructured individual interviews and group interviews were conducted at various healthcare settings-diabetes outpatient clinics in 2 tertiary referral hospitals, 6 primary care practices and 10 community centres in Melbourne, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 100 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited into 2 groups: 60 Arabic-speaking and 40 English-speaking Caucasian. DATA COLLECTION: Interviews were audio-taped, translated into English when necessary, transcribed and coded thematically. Sociodemographic and clinical information was gathered using a self-completed questionnaire and medical records. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Only Arabic-speaking migrants intentionally delayed access to healthcare services when obvious signs of diabetes were experienced, missing opportunities to detect diabetes at an early stage. Four major barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use were identified: influence of significant other(s), unique sociocultural and religious beliefs, experiences with healthcare providers and lack of knowledge about healthcare services. Compared with Arabic-speaking migrants, English-speaking participants had no reluctance to access and use medical services when signs of ill-health appeared; their treatment-seeking behaviours were straightforward. CONCLUSIONS: Arabic-speaking migrants appear to intentionally delay access to medical services even when symptomatic. Four barriers to health services access have been identified. Tailored interventions must be developed for Arabic-speaking migrants to improve access to available health services, facilitate timely diagnosis of diabetes and ultimately to improve glycaemic control.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008687
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BMJ Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080428

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 110 Abstract Views, 17 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 05 Jan 2016, 14:46:14 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.