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Brief reminiscence activities improve state well-being and self-concept in young adults: a randomised controlled experiment

Hallford, David John and Mellor, David 2016, Brief reminiscence activities improve state well-being and self-concept in young adults: a randomised controlled experiment, Memory, vol. 24, no. 10, pp. 1311-1320, doi: 10.1080/09658211.2015.1103875.

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Title Brief reminiscence activities improve state well-being and self-concept in young adults: a randomised controlled experiment
Author(s) Hallford, David John
Mellor, DavidORCID iD for Mellor, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5007-5906
Journal name Memory
Volume number 24
Issue number 10
Start page 1311
End page 1320
Total pages 10
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1464-0686
Keyword(s) Reminiscence therapy
autobiographical memory
cognitive-reminiscence therapy
self-concept
well-being
young adults
Summary Reminiscence-based psychotherapies have been demonstrated to have robust effects on a range of therapeutic outcomes. However, little research has been conducted on the immediate effects of guided activities they are composed of, or how these might differ dependent on the type of reminiscence. The current study utilised a controlled experimental design, whereby 321 young adults (mean age = 25.5 years, SD = 3.0) were randomised to one of four conditions of online reminiscence activity: problem-solving (successful coping experiences), identity (self-defining events contributing to a meaningful and continuous personal identity), bitterness revival (negative or adverse events), or a control condition (any memory from their past). Participants recalled autobiographical memories congruent with the condition, and answered questions to facilitate reflection on the memories. The results indicated that problem-solving and identity reminiscence activities caused significant improvements in self-esteem, meaning in life, self-efficacy and affect, whereas no effects were found in the bitterness revival and control conditions. Problem-solving reminiscence also caused a small effect in increasing perceptions of a life narrative/s. Differences between the conditions did not appear to be explained by the positive-valence of memories. These results provide evidence for the specific effects of adaptive types of problem-solving and identity reminiscence in young adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/09658211.2015.1103875
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080435

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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