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Dietary salt intake and discretionary salt use in two general population samples in Australia: 2011 and 2014

Nowson, Caryl, Lim, Karen, Grimes, Carley, O'Halloran, Siobhan, Land, Mary Anne, Webster, Jacqui, Shaw, Jonathan, Chalmers, John, Smith, Wayne, Flood, Victoria, Woodward, Mark and Neal, Bruce 2015, Dietary salt intake and discretionary salt use in two general population samples in Australia: 2011 and 2014, Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 10501-10512, doi: 10.3390/nu7125545.

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Title Dietary salt intake and discretionary salt use in two general population samples in Australia: 2011 and 2014
Author(s) Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Lim, Karen
Grimes, CarleyORCID iD for Grimes, Carley orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
O'Halloran, Siobhan
Land, Mary Anne
Webster, Jacqui
Shaw, Jonathan
Chalmers, John
Smith, Wayne
Flood, Victoria
Woodward, Mark
Neal, Bruce
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 7
Issue number 12
Start page 10501
End page 10512
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-12-16
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Australia
diet
regional
salt
sodium
sodium chloride
urinary sodium
Summary The limited Australian measures to reduce population sodium intake through national initiatives targeting sodium in the food supply have not been evaluated. The aim was, thus, to assess if there has been a change in salt intake and discretionary salt use between 2011 and 2014 in the state of Victoria, Australia. Adults drawn from a population sample provided 24 h urine collections and reported discretionary salt use in 2011 and 2014. The final sample included 307 subjects who participated in both surveys, 291 who participated in 2011 only, and 135 subjects who participated in 2014 only. Analysis included adjustment for age, gender, metropolitan area, weekend collection and participation in both surveys, where appropriate. In 2011, 598 participants: 53% female, age 57.1(12.0)(SD) years and in 2014, 442 participants: 53% female, age 61.2(10.7) years provided valid urine collections, with no difference in the mean urinary salt excretion between 2011: 7.9 (7.6, 8.2) (95% CI) g/salt/day and 2014: 7.8 (7.5, 8.1) g/salt/day (p = 0.589), and no difference in discretionary salt use: 35% (2011) and 36% (2014) reported adding salt sometimes or often/always at the table (p = 0.76). Those that sometimes or often/always added salt at the table and when cooking had 0.7 (0.7, 0.8) g/salt/day (p = 0.0016) higher salt excretion. There is no indication over this 3-year period that national salt reduction initiatives targeting the food supply have resulted in a population reduction in salt intake. More concerted efforts are required to reduce the salt content of manufactured foods, together with a consumer education campaign targeting the use of discretionary salt.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu7125545
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080460

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.