You are not logged in.

Does self-efficacy mediate the cross-sectional relationship between perceived quality of health care and self-management of diabetes? Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia

Tregea, Hannah, Lee, Christina, Browne, Jessica L., Pouwer, Frans and Speight, Jane 2016, Does self-efficacy mediate the cross-sectional relationship between perceived quality of health care and self-management of diabetes? Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia, Psychology & health, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 1-25, doi: 10.1080/08870446.2015.1128543.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Does self-efficacy mediate the cross-sectional relationship between perceived quality of health care and self-management of diabetes? Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia
Author(s) Tregea, Hannah
Lee, Christina
Browne, Jessica L.
Pouwer, Frans
Speight, Jane
Journal name Psychology & health
Volume number 31
Issue number 5
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1476-8321
Keyword(s) Australia
diabetes
population
quality of care
self-efficacy
self-management
Summary OBJECTIVE: Quality of health care (QoC) and self-efficacy may affect self-management of diabetes, but such effects are not well understood. We examined the indirect role of diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DSE) and generalised self-efficacy (GSE) in mediating the cross-sectional relationship between self-reported QoC and diabetes self-management.

DESIGN: Diabetes MILES-Australia was a national survey of 3,338 adults with diabetes. We analysed data from 1,624 respondents (Age: M=52.1, SD=13.9) with type 1 (T1D; n=680) or type 2 diabetes (T2D; n=944), who responded to a version of the survey containing key measures.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported healthy eating, physical activity, self-monitoring of blood glucose frequency, HbA1c, medication/insulin adherence. RESULTS: We used Preacher and Hayes' bootstrapping method, controlling for age, gender and diabetes duration, to test mediation of DSE and GSE on the relationship of QoC with each self-management variable. We found statistically significant but trivial mediation effects of DSE and of GSE on most, but not all, variables (all effect sizes <0.06).

CONCLUSION: Support for mediation was weak, suggesting that relationships amongst these variables are small and that future research might explore other aspects of self-management in diabetes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2015.1128543
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Taylor & Francis
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080466

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 65 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 06 Jan 2016, 11:11:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.