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Benefits of group foraging depend on prey type in a small marine predator, the Little Penguin

Sutton, Grace J., Hoskins, Andrew J. and Arnould, John P.Y. 2015, Benefits of group foraging depend on prey type in a small marine predator, the Little Penguin, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 12, Article Number : e0144297, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0144297.

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Title Benefits of group foraging depend on prey type in a small marine predator, the Little Penguin
Author(s) Sutton, Grace J.
Hoskins, Andrew J.
Arnould, John P.Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P.Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Season Article Number : e0144297
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0144297
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080470

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.