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Friendship network characteristics are associated with physical activity and sedentary behavior in early adolescence

Marks, Jennifer, de la Haye, Kayla, Barnett, Lisa M. and Allender, Steven 2015, Friendship network characteristics are associated with physical activity and sedentary behavior in early adolescence, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 12, Article Number : e0145344, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0145344.

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Title Friendship network characteristics are associated with physical activity and sedentary behavior in early adolescence
Author(s) Marks, Jennifer
de la Haye, Kayla
Barnett, Lisa M.ORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Allender, Steven
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Season Article Number : e0145344
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary INTRODUCTION: There is limited understanding of the association between peer social networks and physical activity (PA), sedentary and screen-related behaviors. This study reports on associations between personal network characteristics and these important health behaviors for early adolescents. METHODS: Participants were 310 students, aged 11-13 years, from fifteen randomly selected Victorian primary schools (43% response rate). PA and sedentary behaviors were collected via accelerometer and self-report questionnaire, and anthropometric measures via trained researchers. Participants nominated up to fifteen friends, and described the frequency of interaction and perceived activity intensity of these friends. Personal network predictors were examined using regression modelling for PA and sedentary/screen behavior. RESULTS: Perceived activity levels of friends, and friendships with very frequent interaction were associated with outside-of-school PA and/or sedentary/screen time. Differences according to sex were also observed in the association between network characteristics and PA and sedentary time. A higher number of friends and greater proportion of same sex friends were associated with boys engaging in more moderate-to-vigorous PA outside of school hours. PA intensity during school-day breaks was positively associated with having a greater proportion of friends who played sports for girls, and a greater proportion of male friends for boys. CONCLUSION: Friendship network characteristics are associated with PA and sedentary/screen time in late childhood/early adolescence, and these associations differ by sex. The positive influence of very active peers may be a promising avenue to strengthen traditional interventions for the promotion of PA and reduction in screen time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0145344
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080497

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.