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Violence risk assessment in psychiatric patients in China: a systematic review

Zhou, Jiansong, Witt, Katrina, Xiang, Yutao, Zhu, Xiaomin, Wang, Xiaoping and Fazel, Seena 2016, Violence risk assessment in psychiatric patients in China: a systematic review, Australian & New Zealand journal of psychiatry, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 33-45, doi: 10.1177/0004867415585580.

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Title Violence risk assessment in psychiatric patients in China: a systematic review
Author(s) Zhou, Jiansong
Witt, Katrina
Xiang, Yutao
Zhu, Xiaomin
Wang, Xiaoping
Fazel, Seena
Journal name Australian & New Zealand journal of psychiatry
Volume number 50
Issue number 1
Start page 33
End page 45
Total pages 13
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Keyword(s) violence
risk assessment
systematic review
prediction
China
Summary Objectives: The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review on violence risk assessment instruments used for psychiatric patients in China.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted from 1980 until 2014 to identify studies that used psychometric tools or structured instruments to assess aggression and violence risk. Information from primary studies was extracted, including demographic characteristics of the samples used, study design characteristics, and reliability and validity estimates.

Results: A total of 30 primary studies were identified that investigated aggression or violence; 6 reported on tools assessing aggression while an additional 24 studies reported on structured instruments designed to predict violence. Although measures of reliability were typically good, estimates of predictive validity were mostly in the range of poor to moderate, with only 1 study finding good validity. These estimates were typically lower than that found in previous work for Western samples.

Conclusion: There is currently little evidence to support the use of current violence risk assessment instruments in psychiatric patients in China. Developing more accurate and scalable approaches are research priorities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0004867415585580
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080510

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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