The next step in energy rating: the international ETTV method vs. BCA Section-J glazing calculator

Oraee Namzadi, Mehran and Luther, Mark B. 2015, The next step in energy rating: the international ETTV method vs. BCA Section-J glazing calculator, in ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 423-433.

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Title The next step in energy rating: the international ETTV method vs. BCA Section-J glazing calculator
Author(s) Oraee Namzadi, MehranORCID iD for Oraee Namzadi, Mehran orcid.org/0000-0002-5928-4760
Luther, Mark B.ORCID iD for Luther, Mark B. orcid.org/0000-0002-9677-7636
Conference name Architectural Science Association. International Conference (49th : 2015 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 2-4 Dec. 2015
Title of proceedings ASA2015: Living and learning: research for a better built environment : Proceedings of the 49th International conference of the Architectural Science Association
Editor(s) Crawford, R. H.
Stephan, A.
Publication date 2015
Start page 423
End page 433
Total pages 11
Publisher University of Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) ETTV method
BCA Section-J
envelop energy performance
glazing
Summary The most important prevention in minimizing energy transfer in commercial buildings is the treatment of glazing in the building facade. In a commercial building, while the impacts of roof, walls and floors on the overall heating and cooling loads of the building have low effects, glazing is likely to be the most important factor. This paper investigates the BCA Section-J glazing calculator and the ETTV (Envelope Thermal Transfer Value) methods and tries to look for differences as well as similarities in calculation of building envelopes energy performance. For this investigation, a hypothetical high-rise commercial building in Melbourne, Australia is considered when evaluating the energy performance of the envelope through these two methods. Both methods consider the U-Value of glass and wall materials as well as Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) and Shading Coefficient (SC) of the glass. Findings in this research project indicate differences and significant discrepancies between the BCA Section-J and ETTV methods in evaluating the energy performance of commercial building façades. Issues of calculation weaknesses are identified with the lack of air leakage and infiltration of a particular façade design or window to wall ratio (WWR). Suggestions have been made where improvement to the overall energy calculation through facades of a commercial building is needed.
ISBN 9780992383527
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Melbourne
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080521

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