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National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence : findings from a dual-frame omnibus survey

Dowling, N.A., Youssef, G.J., Jackson, A.C., Pennay, D.W., Francis, K.L., Pennay, A. and Lubman,D D.I 2016, National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence : findings from a dual-frame omnibus survey, Addiction, vol. 111, no. 3, pp. 420-435, doi: 10.1111/add.13176.

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Title National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence : findings from a dual-frame omnibus survey
Author(s) Dowling, N.A.
Youssef, G.J.ORCID iD for Youssef, G.J. orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Jackson, A.C.
Pennay, D.W.
Francis, K.L.ORCID iD for Francis, K.L. orcid.org/0000-0002-1751-5313
Pennay, A.
Lubman,D D.I
Journal name Addiction
Volume number 111
Issue number 3
Start page 420
End page 435
Total pages 16
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 1360-0443
Keyword(s) cellphones
dual-frame
gambling
mobile telephone
prevalence
problem gambling
sampling
surveys
Summary BACKGROUND, AIMS AND DESIGN: The increase in mobile telephone-only households may be a source of bias for traditional landline gambling prevalence surveys. Aims were to: (1) identify Australian gambling participation and problem gambling prevalence using a dual-frame (50% landline and 50% mobile telephone) computer-assisted telephone interviewing methodology; (2) explore the predictors of sample frame and telephone status; and (3) explore the degree to which sample frame and telephone status moderate the relationships between respondent characteristics and problem gambling. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2000 adult respondents residing in Australia were interviewed from March to April 2013. MEASUREMENTS: Participation in multiple gambling activities and Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI). FINDINGS: Estimates were: gambling participation [63.9%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 61.4-66.3], problem gambling (0.4%, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8), moderate-risk gambling (1.9%, 95% CI = 1.3-2.6) and low-risk gambling (3.0%, 95% CI = 2.2-4.0). Relative to the landline frame, the mobile frame was more likely to gamble on horse/greyhound races [odds ratio (OR) = 1.4], casino table games (OR = 5.0), sporting events (OR = 2.2), private games (OR = 1.9) and the internet (OR = 6.5); less likely to gamble on lotteries (OR = 0.6); and more likely to gamble on five or more activities (OR = 2.4), display problem gambling (OR = 6.4) and endorse PGSI items (OR = 2.4-6.1). Only casino table gambling (OR = 2.9) and internet gambling (OR = 3.5) independently predicted mobile frame membership. Telephone status (landline frame versus mobile dual users and mobile-only users) displayed similar findings. Finally, sample frame and/or telephone status moderated the relationship between gender, relationship status, health and problem gambling (OR = 2.9-7.6). CONCLUSION: Given expected future increases in the mobile telephone-only population, best practice in population gambling research should use dual frame sampling methodologies (at least 50% landline and 50% mobile telephone) for telephone interviewing.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/add.13176
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080538

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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