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The relationships between illness and treatment perceptions with adherence to diabetes self-care: A comparison between Arabic-speaking migrants and Caucasian English-speaking patients

Alzubaidi, Hamzah, Mc Narmara, Kevin, Kilmartin, Gloria M., Kilmartin, John F. and Marriott, Jennifer 2015, The relationships between illness and treatment perceptions with adherence to diabetes self-care: A comparison between Arabic-speaking migrants and Caucasian English-speaking patients, Diabetes research and clinical practice, vol. 110, no. 2, pp. 208-217, doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.08.006.

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Title The relationships between illness and treatment perceptions with adherence to diabetes self-care: A comparison between Arabic-speaking migrants and Caucasian English-speaking patients
Author(s) Alzubaidi, Hamzah
Mc Narmara, Kevin
Kilmartin, Gloria M.
Kilmartin, John F.
Marriott, Jennifer
Journal name Diabetes research and clinical practice
Volume number 110
Issue number 2
Start page 208
End page 217
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-11
ISSN 0168-8227
Keyword(s) Illness and treatment perceptions
Type 2 diabetes
Arabic-speaking
Adherence
Summary Aims
To compare illness and treatment perceptions between Arabic-speaking immigrants and Caucasian English-speaking people with type 2 diabetes, and explore the relationships between these beliefs and adherence to self-care activities.
Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted in healthcare settings with large Arabic populations in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. Adherence to self-care activities, illness and treatment perceptions, and clinical data were recorded. Bivariate associations for continuous normally distributed variables were tested with Pearson's correlation. Non-parametric data were tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient.
Results

701 participants were recruited; 392 Arabic-speaking participants (ASPs) and 309 English-speaking participants (ESPs). There were significant relationships between participants’ illness and treatment perceptions and adherence to diabetes self-care activities. ASPs’ negative beliefs about diabetes were strongly and significantly correlated with poorer adherence to diet recommendations, exercise, blood glucose testing and foot care. ASPs were significantly less adherent to all aspects of diabetes self-care compared with ESPs: dietary behaviours (P = <0.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) = −1.17, −0.84), exercise and physical activity (P = <0.001, 95% CI −1.14, −0.61), blood glucose testing (P = <0.001) and foot-care (P = <0.001). 52.8% of ASPs were sceptical about prescribed diabetes treatment compared with only 11.2% of the ESPs. 88.3% of ASPs were non-adherent to prescribed medication, compared with 45.1% of ESPs.

Conclusions
Arabic-speaking migrants’ illness and treatment perceptions were significantly different from the English-speaking group. There is a pressing need to develop new innovative interventions that deliver much-needed improvements in adherence to self-care activities and key health outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.08.006
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080556

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Population Health
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