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Residual DNA on examination tools following use

Szkuta, B., Harvey, M.L., Ballantyne, K.N. and van Oorschot, R.A.H. 2015, Residual DNA on examination tools following use, Forensic science international: genetics supplement series, vol. 5, pp. 495-497, doi: 10.1016/j.fsigss.2015.09.196.

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Title Residual DNA on examination tools following use
Author(s) Szkuta, B.ORCID iD for Szkuta, B. orcid.org/0000-0003-2272-5355
Harvey, M.L.ORCID iD for Harvey, M.L. orcid.org/0000-0002-4047-7845
Ballantyne, K.N.
van Oorschot, R.A.H.
Journal name Forensic science international: genetics supplement series
Volume number 5
Start page 495
End page 497
Total pages 3
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 1875-1768
1875-175X
Keyword(s) Trace
DNA
Transfer
Contamination
Examination tools
Summary Recent studies observing the transfer of DNA via examination tools used within forensic laboratories (scissors, forceps and gloves) have highlighted the contamination risk of such implements if protocols following their use and replacement are not adhered to. Whilst these previous studies focus primarily on the transfer of biological substances to a substrate via high-risk vectors, this investigation considers the proportion of DNA that remains on the high-risk vectors following contact with the substrate. Dried blood or touch DNA was deposited on cotton or glass substrates to create mock exhibits. Following primary contact with the deposit, the vector similarly contacted a secondary DNA-free substrate. Combinations of singular and multiple contacts were applied. Immediately following contact with the secondary substrate, the vector was sampled in order to determine the proportion of DNA-containing material remaining on the vectors following contacts. Residual DNA was detected on the vectors in most instances, with the amount retained influenced by the vector, substrates and biological substance applied. The results demonstrate the potential for inter- and intra-exhibit contamination through further contacts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.fsigss.2015.09.196
Field of Research 069901 Forensic Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080606

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