How social work can contribute in the shift to personalised, recovery-oriented psycho-social disability support services

Brophy, Lisa, Bruxner, Annie, Wilson, Erin, Cocks, Nadine and Stylianou, Michael 2015, How social work can contribute in the shift to personalised, recovery-oriented psycho-social disability support services, The British journal of social work, vol. 45, no. s1, pp. i98-i116, doi: 10.1093/bjsw/bcv094.

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Title How social work can contribute in the shift to personalised, recovery-oriented psycho-social disability support services
Author(s) Brophy, Lisa
Bruxner, Annie
Wilson, ErinORCID iD for Wilson, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6417-7276
Cocks, Nadine
Stylianou, Michael
Journal name The British journal of social work
Volume number 45
Issue number s1
Start page i98
End page i116
Total pages 19
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015-11
ISSN 0045-3102
1468-263X
Summary This paper presents the findings from an Australian study in which forty-one people, who self-identified as having a psycho-social disability as a result of mental health problems, spoke about their priorities for treatment, care and support within a personalised funding context. The research enabled an improved understanding of the choices about support that people with psycho-social disabilities would make if offered individualised funding packages. Participants prioritised specific supports to improve their health, financial situation, social connection, housing and personal relationships. A relationship with a support worker with a range of skills was identified as a key facilitator of these life goals, but people with psycho-social disabilities also valued opportunities to have discretionary funds to directly address the major problems they face, including stigma, discrimination and poverty. The paper argues that social workers can potentially fill a range of roles and are well placed to work in partnership with people with psycho-social disabilities. Particularly, they have skills in co-production of services, negotiation and advocacy that are required if individual funding is to be maximised for user control, social justice and personal recovery outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bcv094
Field of Research 1607 Social Work
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080610

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
2018 ERA Submission
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