You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Low-volume high-intensity interval training in a gym setting improves cardio-metabolic and psychological health

Shepherd, Sam O., Wilson, Oliver J., Taylor, Alexandra S., Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie, Adlan, Ahmed M., Wagenmakers, Anton J. M. and Shaw, Christopher S. 2015, Low-volume high-intensity interval training in a gym setting improves cardio-metabolic and psychological health, PLoS ONE, vol. 10, no. 9, Article Number : e0139056, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0139056.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
shaw-lowvolume-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.85MB 16

Title Low-volume high-intensity interval training in a gym setting improves cardio-metabolic and psychological health
Author(s) Shepherd, Sam O.
Wilson, Oliver J.
Taylor, Alexandra S.
Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
Adlan, Ahmed M.
Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.
Shaw, Christopher S.ORCID iD for Shaw, Christopher S. orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 10
Issue number 9
Season Article Number : e0139056
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Background Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT) elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment. Purpose To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, groupbased gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max), cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT. Methods Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2) were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax) interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≥25 min.session-1, 3 sessions. week-1). MICT participants performed continuous cycling (70%HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1). VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention. Results Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT) and 128±44 min (MICT) (p<0.05), with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05). HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05). HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05). No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables. Conclusions HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0139056
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080616

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 124 Abstract Views, 17 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 08 Jan 2016, 14:52:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.