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Mixed method evaluation of a community-based physical activity program using the RE-AIM framework: practical application in a real-world setting

Koorts, Harriet and Gillison, Fiona 2015, Mixed method evaluation of a community-based physical activity program using the RE-AIM framework: practical application in a real-world setting, BMC public health, vol. 15, Article Number : 1102, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2466-y.

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Title Mixed method evaluation of a community-based physical activity program using the RE-AIM framework: practical application in a real-world setting
Author(s) Koorts, HarrietORCID iD for Koorts, Harriet orcid.org/0000-0003-1303-6064
Gillison, Fiona
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 15
Season Article Number : 1102
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Physical activity
Program evaluation
RE-AIM
Summary BACKGROUND: Communities are a pivotal setting in which to promote increases in child and adolescent physical activity behaviours. Interventions implemented in these settings require effective evaluation to facilitate translation of findings to wider settings. The aims of this paper are to i) present findings from a RE-AIM evaluation of a community-based physical activity program, and ii) review the methodological challenges faced when applying RE-AIM in practice.

METHODS: A single mixed-methods case study was conducted based on a concurrent triangulation design. Five sources of data were collected via interviews, questionnaires, archival records, documentation and field notes. Evidence was triangulated within RE-AIM to assess individual and organisational-level program outcomes.

RESULTS: Inconsistent availability of data and a lack of robust reporting challenged assessment of all five dimensions. Reach, Implementation and setting-level Adoption were less successful, Effectiveness and Maintenance at an individual and organisational level were moderately successful. Only community-level Adoption was highly successful, reflecting the key program goal to provide community-wide participation in sport and physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS: This research highlighted important methodological constraints associated with the use of RE-AIM in practice settings. Future evaluators wishing to use RE-AIM may benefit from a mixed-method triangulation approach to offset challenges with data availability and reliability.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2466-y
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080619

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.