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Molecular pathogenesis of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza: the role of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif

Luczo, Jasmina M, Stambas, John, Durr, Peter A, Michalski, Wojtek P and Bingham, John 2015, Molecular pathogenesis of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza: the role of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif, Reviews in medical virology, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 406-430, doi: 10.1002/rmv.1846.

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Title Molecular pathogenesis of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza: the role of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif
Author(s) Luczo, Jasmina M
Stambas, JohnORCID iD for Stambas, John orcid.org/0000-0002-5690-2551
Durr, Peter A
Michalski, Wojtek P
Bingham, John
Journal name Reviews in medical virology
Volume number 25
Issue number 6
Start page 406
End page 430
Total pages 25
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-11
ISSN 1099-1654
Keyword(s) A viruses
Airborne transmission
Amino-acid residues
Hong- Kong
Host- cell proteases
Membrane- fusion
Protective antigen
Reverse genetics
Virus hemagglutinin
28S ribosomal- RNA
Summary The emergence of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza has caused a heavy socio-economic burden through culling of poultry to minimise human and livestock infection. Although human infections with H5N1 have to date been limited, concerns for the pandemic potential of this zoonotic virus have been greatly intensified following experimental evidence of aerosol transmission of H5N1 viruses in a mammalian infection model. In this review, we discuss the dominance of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif as a pathogenicity determinant, the host-pathogen molecular interactions driving cleavage activation, reverse genetics manipulations and identification of residues key to haemagglutinin cleavage site functionality and the mechanisms of cell and tissue damage during H5N1 infection. We specifically focus on the disease in chickens, as it is in this species that high pathogenicity frequently evolves and from which transmission to the human population occurs. With >75% of emerging infectious diseases being of zoonotic origin, it is necessary to understand pathogenesis in the primary host to explain spillover events into the human population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/rmv.1846
Field of Research 1108 Medical Microbiology
110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080621

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Molecular and Medical Research
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