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Exploring omega-3 fatty acids, enzymes and biodiesel producing thraustochytrids from Australian and Indian marine biodiversity

Gupta, Adarsha, Singh, Dilip, Byreddy, Avinesh R., Thyagarajan,Tamilselvi, Sonkar, Shailendra P., Mathur, Anshu S., Tuli, Deepak K., Barrow, Colin J. and Puri, Munish 2016, Exploring omega-3 fatty acids, enzymes and biodiesel producing thraustochytrids from Australian and Indian marine biodiversity, Biotechnology journal, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 345-355, doi: 10.1002/biot.201500279.

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Title Exploring omega-3 fatty acids, enzymes and biodiesel producing thraustochytrids from Australian and Indian marine biodiversity
Author(s) Gupta, Adarsha
Singh, Dilip
Byreddy, Avinesh R.
Thyagarajan,Tamilselvi
Sonkar, Shailendra P.
Mathur, Anshu S.
Tuli, Deepak K.
Barrow, Colin J.ORCID iD for Barrow, Colin J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2153-7267
Puri, MunishORCID iD for Puri, Munish orcid.org/0000-0003-2469-3326
Journal name Biotechnology journal
Volume number 11
Issue number 3
Start page 345
End page 355
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 1860-6768
1860-7314
Keyword(s) Schizochytrium
algal biorefinery
bioactives
biodiesel production
marine microalgae
Summary The marine environment harbours a vast diversity of microorganisms, many of which are unique, and have potential to produce commercially useful materials. Therefore, marine biodiversity from Australian and Indian habitat has been explored to produce novel bioactives, and enzymes. Among these, thraustochytrids collected from Indian habitats were shown to be rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), together constituting 51-76 % of total fatty acids (TFA). Indian and Australian thraustochytrids occupy separate positions in the dendrogram, showing significant differences exist in the fatty acid profiles in these two sets of thraustochytrid strains. In general, Australian strains had a higher docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content than Indian strains with DHA at 17-31 % of TFA. A range of enzyme activities were observed in the strains, with Australian strains showing overall higher levels of enzyme activity, with the exception of one Indian strain (DBTIOC-1). Comparative analysis of the fatty acid profile of 34 strains revealed that Indian thraustochytrids are more suitable for biodiesel production since these strains have higher fatty acids content for biodiesel (FAB, 76 %) production than Australian thraustochytrids, while the Australian strains are more suitable for omega-3 (40 %) production.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/biot.201500279
Field of Research 1002 Environmental Biotechnology
1003 Industrial Biotechnology
1004 Medical Biotechnology
060107 Enzymes
060101 Analytical Biochemistry
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080668

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