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Effects of an intradialytic resistance training programme on physical function: a prospective stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial

Bennett, Paul, Fraser, Steven, Barnard, R, Haines, T, Ockerby, Cherene, Street, Maryann, Wang, Wei Chun and Daly, Robin 2016, Effects of an intradialytic resistance training programme on physical function: a prospective stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial, Nephrology dialysis transplantation, vol. 31, no. 8, pp. 1302-1309, doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfv416.

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Title Effects of an intradialytic resistance training programme on physical function: a prospective stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Bennett, PaulORCID iD for Bennett, Paul orcid.org/0000-0001-9174-3499
Fraser, StevenORCID iD for Fraser, Steven orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-9619
Barnard, R
Haines, T
Ockerby, Cherene
Street, MaryannORCID iD for Street, Maryann orcid.org/0000-0002-5615-141X
Wang, Wei ChunORCID iD for Wang, Wei Chun orcid.org/0000-0003-4287-1704
Daly, RobinORCID iD for Daly, Robin orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Journal name Nephrology dialysis transplantation
Volume number 31
Issue number 8
Start page 1302
End page 1309
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford Univeristy Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1460-2385
Keyword(s) exercise therapy
randomized controlled trial
renal dialysis
resistance training
Summary BACKGROUND: Intradialytic exercise programmes are important because of the deterioration in physical function that occurs in people receiving haemodialysis. Unfortunately, exercise programmes are rarely sustained in haemodialysis clinics. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a sustainable resistance exercise programme on the physical function of people receiving haemodialysis. METHODS: A total of 171 participants from 15 community satellite haemodialysis clinics performed progressive resistance training using resistance elastic bands in a seated position during the first hour of haemodialysis treatment. We used a stepped-wedge design of three groups, each containing five randomly allocated cluster units allocated to an intervention of 12, 24 or 36 weeks. The primary outcome measure was objective physical function measured by the 30-s sit-to-stand (STS) test, the 8-foot timed up and go (TUG) test and the four-square step test. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life, involvement in community activity, blood pressure and self-reported falls. RESULTS: Exercise training led to significant improvements in physical function as measured by STS and TUG. There was a significant average downward change (β = -1.59, P < 0.01) before the intervention and a significant upward change after the intervention (β = 0.38, P < 0.01) for the 30-s STS with a similar pattern noted for the TUG. CONCLUSION: Intradialytic resistance training can improve the physical function of people receiving dialysis.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/ndt/gfv416
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080679

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