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Interns are from Venus, consultants are from Mars: differential perception among clinicians

Nair, Balakrishnan, Attia, John R., Bowe, Steven J., Mears, Stephen R. and Hitchcock, Karen I. 2003, Interns are from Venus, consultants are from Mars: differential perception among clinicians, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 179, no. 11, pp. 659-661.

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Title Interns are from Venus, consultants are from Mars: differential perception among clinicians
Author(s) Nair, Balakrishnan
Attia, John R.
Bowe, Steven J.ORCID iD for Bowe, Steven J. orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Mears, Stephen R.
Hitchcock, Karen I.
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 179
Issue number 11
Start page 659
End page 661
Total pages 3
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2003-12
ISSN 1326-5377
Summary OBJECTIVE: To test for the presence of sex-based differences in perception (the notion that men and women "think" differently, and that differences in perception are biologically based) among healthcare professionals. DESIGN: Prospective survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 90 medical personnel at a tertiary care hospital in Newcastle, NSW. INTERVENTION: Healthcare professionals were shown two pictures that could be interpreted as depicting either a young or an old person, and a word that could be seen as geometric shapes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The effects of sex, age, seniority, and specialisation in relation to the first impression of the image, the ability to change one's perception, and the speed of perception. RESULTS: Contrary to popular opinion, male physicians were more likely to perceive the older figures, and just as likely as women to be able to change their perception. Surgeons and junior staff were more likely to see, as well as being faster to form, an impression requiring abstract thought, and were more able to change their perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional sex stereotypes do not apply to medical personnel, but other age-based stereotypes, and professional rivalries (medical versus surgical) may have some empiric basis.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080788

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: PVC's Office - Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.