Researching early career teachers and gender differences: ramifications for rural education

Allard, Andrea, Kline, Jodie and Walker-Gibbs, Bernadette 2015, Researching early career teachers and gender differences: ramifications for rural education, in SPERA 2015 : Mapping education policy landscapes: Rurality and rural futures : Proceedings of the 31st National Conference of the Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia, Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-1.

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Title Researching early career teachers and gender differences: ramifications for rural education
Author(s) Allard, Andrea
Kline, Jodie
Walker-Gibbs, BernadetteORCID iD for Walker-Gibbs, Bernadette orcid.org/0000-0002-7175-7874
Conference name Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia. Conference (31st : 2015 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 4-6 Nov. 2015
Title of proceedings SPERA 2015 : Mapping education policy landscapes: Rurality and rural futures : Proceedings of the 31st National Conference of the Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia
Publication date 2015
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary Recent research into the lives of early career teachers’ in Victoria and Queensland suggest that gender remains a significant factor in shaping the careers of those teaching in rural and regional schools. The cohort of nearly 5,000 teachers involved in the ARC-funded research project, ‘Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education’ (SETE) has a high proportion of females (78%). This composition is consistent with other large-scale datasets and across four rounds of SETE surveys between 2010-2014, and reflected in Case Studies of a selection of Victorian rural and regional schools. Continued perceptions of teaching as an ‘appropriate’ career for women remains - that is, it is reasonably well paid, with holidays and hours that allow a combination of responsibilities in work and family contexts (Acker, 1994). Yet, the analysis of SETE career progression data shows that employment and career chances of female and male graduate teachers diverge. Male graduates were more likely to be employed in full time positions and saw themselves in a leadership role in three years’ time, while female graduates were more likely to be employed in part-time positions and saw themselves teaching or in other education related occupations in the future. Interestingly, there was also significant difference in the perceptions of preparedness and effectiveness scores for males and females, with female teachers consistently reporting higher scores for both scales. In this paper, we examine the research data with regards to gender differences in rural and regional primary schools and ask the question: thirty years after the first Affirmative Action Plan for Women in the Victorian Teaching Service (1986), why do these gender differences in teaching careers still hold true—and does it matter in rural education?
ISBN 9780958580311
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 939903 Equity and Access to Education
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2015, SPERA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080807

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