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First, do no harm: managing the metabolic impacts of androgen deprivation in men with advanced prostate cancer

Lomax, Anna, Parente, Phillip, Gilfillan, Chris, Livingston, Patricia, Davis, Ian and Pezaro, Carmel 2016, First, do no harm: managing the metabolic impacts of androgen deprivation in men with advanced prostate cancer, Internal medicine journal, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 141-148, doi: 10.1111/imj.12731.

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Title First, do no harm: managing the metabolic impacts of androgen deprivation in men with advanced prostate cancer
Author(s) Lomax, Anna
Parente, Phillip
Gilfillan, Chris
Livingston, Patricia
Davis, Ian
Pezaro, Carmel
Journal name Internal medicine journal
Volume number 46
Issue number 2
Start page 141
End page 148
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1445-5994
Keyword(s) advanced prostate cancer
androgen deprivation therapy
metabolic complication
supportive care
Summary Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a standard systemic treatment for men with prostate cancer. Men on ADT may be elderly and have comorbidities that are exacerbated by ADT, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and osteoporosis. Studies on managing the impacts of ADT have focused on men with non-metastatic disease, where ADT is given for a limited duration. However, some men with advanced or metastatic prostate cancer will achieve long-term survival with palliative ADT and therefore also risk morbidity from prolonged ADT. Furthermore, ADT is continued during the use of other survival-prolonging therapies for men with advanced disease, and there is a general trend to use ADT earlier in the disease course. As survival improves, management of the metabolic effects of ADT becomes important for maintaining both quality and quantity of life. This review will outline the current data, offer perspectives for management of ADT complications in men with advanced prostate cancer and discuss avenues for further research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/imj.12731
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080833

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Wed, 09 Mar 2016, 14:21:50 EST

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