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‘It should be a big responsibility’: Separated low-income mothers’ evaluation of child support arrangements and the conduct of fathers

McKenzie, Hayley and Cook, Kay 2015, ‘It should be a big responsibility’: Separated low-income mothers’ evaluation of child support arrangements and the conduct of fathers, Australian journal of family law, vol. 29, pp. 135-156.

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Title ‘It should be a big responsibility’: Separated low-income mothers’ evaluation of child support arrangements and the conduct of fathers
Author(s) McKenzie, HayleyORCID iD for McKenzie, Hayley orcid.org/0000-0002-9871-3740
Cook, Kay
Journal name Australian journal of family law
Volume number 29
Start page 135
End page 156
Total pages 22
Publisher LexisNexis
Place of publication North Ryde, N.S.W.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0817-623X
Summary The Australian Child Support Scheme was established as a means of ensuring adequate financial support for children of separated parents. However, within the financial transfer of child support exist notions of ‘trust’ and ‘fairness’ based on parents navigating their changed relationship post-separation. Previous research has explored the assessment and outcomes of child support for both payee and payer parents, however little attention has been given to how women evaluate the assessment and outcomes of child support. As such, this research aimed to explore payee mothers’ evaluation of their child support experiences based on the value of their child support assessment and the extent to which these payments were received. Following the methods of constructivist grounded theory, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 low-income single mothers. Analysis revealed that payee mothers evaluated child support based on the moral assumptions and the rationalities they perceived were underlying payer fathers’ child support compliance. While payee mothers desired arrangements that reflected joint parental financial responsibility, in reality many experienced problematic child support payments, which may ultimately undermine payee parents’ confidence in the Child Support Scheme.
Language eng
Field of Research 1607 Social Work
1801 Law
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, LexisNexis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080862

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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