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Cracking the egg: an insight into egg hypersensitivity

Dhanapala, Pathum, De Silva, Chamika, Doran, Tim and Suphioglu, Cenk 2015, Cracking the egg: an insight into egg hypersensitivity, Molecular immunology, vol. 66, no. 2, pp. 375-383, doi: 10.1016/j.molimm.2015.04.016.

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Title Cracking the egg: an insight into egg hypersensitivity
Author(s) Dhanapala, Pathum
De Silva, Chamika
Doran, Tim
Suphioglu, Cenk
Journal name Molecular immunology
Volume number 66
Issue number 2
Start page 375
End page 383
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-08
ISSN 1872-9142
1872-9142
Keyword(s) Allergy
Egg allergens
Egg white allergy
Egg yolk allergy
Hypersensitivity
Allergens
Animals
B-Lymphocytes
Basophils
Chickens
Child
Desensitization, Immunologic
Diet
Egg Hypersensitivity
Egg Proteins
Egg White
Egg Yolk
Humans
Immunoglobulin E
T-Lymphocytes
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Immunology
CHICKEN SERUM-ALBUMIN
AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCE
FOOD ALLERGY
HENS-EGG
HEAT-TREATMENT
ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
OVIDUCT DEVELOPMENT
ATOPIC-DERMATITIS
ESCHERICHIA-COLI
CROSS-REACTIVITY
Summary Hypersensitivity to the chicken egg is a widespread disorder mainly affecting 1-2% of children worldwide. It is the second most common food allergy in children, next to cow's milk allergy. Egg allergy is mainly caused by hypersensitivity to four allergens found in the egg white; ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme. However, some research suggests the involvement of allergens exclusively found in the egg yolk such as chicken serum albumin and YGP42, which may play a crucial role in the overall reaction. In egg allergic individuals, these allergens cause conditions such as itching, atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, vomiting, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, laryngeal oedema and chronic urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Currently there is no permanent cure for egg allergy. Upon positive diagnosis for egg allergy, strict dietary avoidance of eggs and products containing traces of eggs is the most effective way of avoiding future hypersensitivity reactions. However, it is difficult to fully avoid eggs since they are found in a range of processed food products. An understanding of the mechanisms of allergic reactions, egg allergens and their prevalence, egg allergy diagnosis and current treatment strategies are important for future studies. This review addresses these topics and discusses both egg white and egg yolk allergy as a whole.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.molimm.2015.04.016
Field of Research 110701 Allergy
1107 Immunology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080910

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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