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Citizen science program shows urban areas have lower occurrence of frog species, but not accelerated declines

Westgate, Martin J., Scheele, Ben C., Ikin, Karen, Hoefer, Anke Maria, Beaty, R. Matthew, Evans, Murray, Osborne, Will, Hunter, David, Rayner, Laura and Driscoll, Don A. 2015, Citizen science program shows urban areas have lower occurrence of frog species, but not accelerated declines, PLoS, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140973.

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Title Citizen science program shows urban areas have lower occurrence of frog species, but not accelerated declines
Author(s) Westgate, Martin J.
Scheele, Ben C.
Ikin, Karen
Hoefer, Anke Maria
Beaty, R. Matthew
Evans, Murray
Osborne, Will
Hunter, David
Rayner, Laura
Driscoll, Don A.ORCID iD for Driscoll, Don A. orcid.org/0000-0002-1560-5235
Journal name PLoS
Volume number 10
Issue number 11
Article ID e0140973
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015-11-18
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Australia
Biodiversity
Conservation of Natural Resources
Consumer Participation
Female
Male
Population Dynamics
Ranidae
Urbanization
Wetlands
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH
COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
EXTINCTION
LANDSCAPE
ABUNDANCE
RICHNESS
HABITAT
TOOL
CHRONOSEQUENCES
Summary Understanding the influence of landscape change on animal populations is critical to inform biodiversity conservation efforts. A particularly important goal is to understand how urban density affects the persistence of animal populations through time, and how these impacts can be mediated by habitat provision; but data on this question are limited for some taxa. Here, we use data from a citizen science monitoring program to investigate the effect of urbanization on patterns of frog species richness and occurrence over 13 years. Sites surrounded by a high proportion of bare ground (a proxy for urbanization) had consistently lower frog occurrence, but we found no evidence that declines were restricted to urban areas. Instead, several frog species showed declines in rural wetlands with low-quality habitat. Our analysis shows that urban wetlands had low but stable species richness; but also that population trajectories are strongly influenced by vegetation provision in both the riparian zone and the wider landscape. Future increases in the extent of urban environments in our study area are likely to negatively impact populations of several frog species. However, existing urban areas are unlikely to lose further frog species in the medium term. We recommend that landscape planning and management focus on the conservation and restoration of rural wetlands to arrest current declines, and the revegetation of urban wetlands to facilitate the re-expansion of urban-sensitive species.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0140973
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080911

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.