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Problem gambling patterns among Australian young adults: associations with prospective risk and protective factors and adult adjustment outcomes

Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E., Hemphill, Sheryl A., Toumbourou, John W. and Dowling, Nicki A. 2016, Problem gambling patterns among Australian young adults: associations with prospective risk and protective factors and adult adjustment outcomes, Addictive behaviors, vol. 55, pp. 38-45, doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.12.016.

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Title Problem gambling patterns among Australian young adults: associations with prospective risk and protective factors and adult adjustment outcomes
Author(s) Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E.
Hemphill, Sheryl A.
Toumbourou, John W.ORCID iD for Toumbourou, John W. orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Dowling, Nicki A.ORCID iD for Dowling, Nicki A. orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Journal name Addictive behaviors
Volume number 55
Start page 38
End page 45
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1873-6327
Keyword(s) Adult adjustment
Longitudinal study
Problem gambling
Protective factors
Risk factors
Summary There is instability in the developmental course of problem gambling [PG] over time; however, studies that examine PG at an aggregate level obscure these variations. The current study employed data from a longitudinal study of Australian young adults to investigate: 1) PG patterns (i.e., resistance, persistence, desistence, and new incidence); 2) prospective risk and protective factors for these patterns; and 3) behavioural outcomes associated with these patterns. A sample of 2261 young adults (55.73% female) from Victoria, Australia, who were part of the International Youth Development Study completed a survey in 2010 (T1, age 21) and 2012 (T2, age 23) measuring PG (two items based on established measures), risk and protective factors, and behavioural outcomes. The majority of the sample (91.69%) were resistors (no PG at T1 and T2), 3.62% were new incidence PG cases, 2.63% were desistors (PG at T1 but not T2), and 2.07% reported persistent PG at T1 and T2. Individual civic activism was protective of new incidence PG, while affiliation with antisocial peers and frequent alcohol use increased the risk of persistence. Persistent problem gamblers also experienced the greatest number of poor behavioural outcomes at T2. New incidence was associated with internalising symptoms at T2, while desistance was not associated with any behavioural outcomes. In conclusion, each PG pattern was associated with different predictors and outcomes, highlighting the need to consider variation in the course of young adult PG in order to provide efficacious prevention and intervention approaches, and to protect against relapse.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.12.016
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID ARC DP0663371
ARCO877359
ARC DP1095744
NHMRC 594793
Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Grants for Gambling Research
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080927

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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