You are not logged in.

Retirement patterns of Australian doctors aged 65 years and older.

Joyce, Catherine M., Wang, Wei C. and McDonald, Hayley M. 2015, Retirement patterns of Australian doctors aged 65 years and older., Australian health review, vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 582-587, doi: 10.1071/AH14176.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Retirement patterns of Australian doctors aged 65 years and older.
Author(s) Joyce, Catherine M.
Wang, Wei C.
McDonald, Hayley M.
Journal name Australian health review
Volume number 39
Issue number 5
Start page 582
End page 587
Total pages 6
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0156-5788
Keyword(s) discrete time survival analysis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
longitudinal survey
GENERAL-PRACTITIONERS
BALANCING EMPLOYMENT
QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY
LIFE MABEL
INTENTIONS
MEDICINE
WORK
ATTITUDES
Summary OBJECTIVE: To investigate retirements over a 4-year period among Australian general practitioners (UPs) and specialists aged 65 years and over, and factors influencing retirement. METHODS: Data from Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) for the years 2009-12 were analysed for 435 GPs and 643 specialists aged 65 years and over at the time of entry to the MABEL survey. Discrete time survival analysis was used. RESULTS: The retirement rates were 4.1% (2009), 5.1% (2010), 4.2% (2011) and 10.4% (2012). Retirement was associated with: (1) the intention to leave medical work in 2009 and 2010; (2) working fewer hours in private consulting rooms in 2010 and 2012; (3) having lower job satisfaction in 2009 and 2011; (4) being older in 2009; (5) working fewer hours in a public hospital in 2012; and (6) working fewer hours in a private hospital in 2010. Doctors who intended to reduce their working hours were less likely to retire in 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies to support doctors at the late career stage to provide their valued contributions to the medical workforce for as long as possible may include increasing job satisfaction and addressing barriers to reducing work hours.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/AH14176
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1605 Policy And Administration
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080994

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 44 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 28 Jan 2016, 13:27:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.