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Prevalence of mental health disorders in inflammatory bowel disease: an Australian outpatient cohort

Tribbick, Davina, Salzberg, Michael, Ftanou, Maria, Connell, William R., Macrae, Finlay, Kamm, Michael A., Bates, Glen W., Cunningham, Georgina, Austin, David W. and Knowles, Simon R. 2015, Prevalence of mental health disorders in inflammatory bowel disease: an Australian outpatient cohort, Clinical and experimental gastroenterology, vol. 8, pp. 197-204, doi: 10.2147/CEG.S77567.

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Title Prevalence of mental health disorders in inflammatory bowel disease: an Australian outpatient cohort
Author(s) Tribbick, Davina
Salzberg, Michael
Ftanou, Maria
Connell, William R.
Macrae, Finlay
Kamm, Michael A.
Bates, Glen W.
Cunningham, Georgina
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Knowles, Simon R.
Journal name Clinical and experimental gastroenterology
Volume number 8
Start page 197
End page 204
Total pages 8
Publisher Dove Medical Press
Place of publication Macclesfield, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07-17
ISSN 1178-7023
Keyword(s) disease activity
inflammatory bowel disease
psychological conditions
Summary BACKGROUND: This study aimed to characterize prevalence of anxiety and depressive conditions and uptake of mental health services in an Australian inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) outpatient setting.

METHODS: Eighty-one IBD patients (39 males, mean age 35 years) attending a tertiary hospital IBD outpatient clinic participated in this study. Disease severity was evaluated according to the Manitoba Index. Diagnosis of an anxiety or depressive condition was based upon the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

RESULTS: Based on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale subscale scores >8 and meeting Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview criteria, 16 (19.8%) participants had at least one anxiety condition, while nine (11.1%) had a depressive disorder present. Active IBD status was associated with higher prevalence rates across all anxiety and depressive conditions. Generalized anxiety was the most common (12 participants, 14.8%) anxiety condition, and major depressive disorder (recurrent) was the most common depressive condition reported (five participants, 6.2%). Seventeen participants (21%) reported currently seeking help for mental health issues while 12.4% were identified has having at least one psychological condition but not seeking treatment.

CONCLUSION: We conclude that rates of anxiety and depression are high in this cohort, and that IBD-focused psychological services should be a key component of any holistic IBD service, especially for those identified as having active IBD.
Language eng
DOI 10.2147/CEG.S77567
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30080999

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.