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Pyrolysis of municipal green waste: a modelling, simulation and experimental analysis

Kabir, Mohammed J., Chowdhury, Ashfaque Ahmed and Rasul, Mohammad G. 2015, Pyrolysis of municipal green waste: a modelling, simulation and experimental analysis, Energies, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 7522-7541, doi: 10.3390/en8087522.

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Title Pyrolysis of municipal green waste: a modelling, simulation and experimental analysis
Author(s) Kabir, Mohammed J.
Chowdhury, Ashfaque Ahmed
Rasul, Mohammad G.
Journal name Energies
Volume number 8
Issue number 8
Start page 7522
End page 7541
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-07-23
ISSN 1996-1073
Summary Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical conversion of carbonaceous feedstock in the absence of oxygen to produce bio-fuel (bio-oil, bio-char and syn-gas). Bio-fuel production from municipal green waste (MGW) through the pyrolysis process has attracted considerable attention recently in the renewable energy sector because it can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to energy security. This study analyses properties of MGW feedstock available in Rockhampton city of Central Queensland, Australia, and presents an experimental investigation of producing bio-fuel from that MGW through the pyrolysis process using a short sealed rotary furnace. It was found from the experiment that about 19.97% bio-oil, 40.83% bio-char and 29.77% syn-gas can be produced from the MGW. Then, a four-stage steady state simulation model is developed for pyrolysis process performance simulation using Aspen Plus software. In the first stage, the moisture content of the MGW feed is reduced. In the second stage, the MGW is decomposed according to its elemental constituents. In the third stage, condensate material is separated and, finally, the pyrolysis reactions are modelled using the Gibbs free energy minimisation approach. The MGW's ultimate and proximate analysis data were used in the Aspen Plus simulation as input parameters. The model is validated with experimentally measured data. A good agreement between simulation and experimental results was found. More specifically, the variation of modelling and experimental elemental compositions of the MGW was found to be 7.3% for carbon, 15.82% for hydrogen, 7.04% for nitrogen and 5.56% for sulphur. The validated model is used to optimise the biofuel production from the MGW as a function of operating variables such as temperature, moisture content, particle size and process heat air-fuel ratio. The modelling and optimisation results are presented, analysed and discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/en8087522
Field of Research 090608 Renewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl Solar Cells)
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081026

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.