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Whether smaller plates reduce consumption depends on who’s serving and who’s looking: a meta-analysis

Holden, Stephen S., Zlatevska, Natalina and Dubelaar, Chris 2016, Whether smaller plates reduce consumption depends on who’s serving and who’s looking: a meta-analysis, Journal of the association of consumer research, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 134-146, doi: 10.1086/684441.

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Title Whether smaller plates reduce consumption depends on who’s serving and who’s looking: a meta-analysis
Author(s) Holden, Stephen S.
Zlatevska, Natalina
Dubelaar, Chris
Journal name Journal of the association of consumer research
Volume number 1
Issue number 1
Start page 134
End page 146
Total pages 13
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 2378-1815
2378-1823
Summary The literature on whether varying plate size has an effect on consumption is mixed and contradictory.This meta-analysis of 56 studies from 20 papers shows that varying the size of the container holding food (e.g., plate orbowl) has a substantial effect on amount self-served and/or consumed (Cohen’s d 5 .43). More generally, we found adoubling of plate size increased the amount self-served or amount consumed by 41%. Our analysis resolves the variouscontradictions of past reviews: we found that the plate-size effect had a substantial effect on amount self-served (d 5.51) and on amount consumed when the portion was self-served (d 5 .70) or manipulated along with (confoundedwith) plate size (d 5 48). However, plate size had no effect on amount consumed when the portion size was held constant(d 5 .03). Overall, plate size had a stronger effect when participants were unaware that they were participatingin a food study (d 5 .76).
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/684441
Field of Research 150501 Consumer-Oriented Product Or Service Development
111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Association for Consumer Research
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081059

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.