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Long-term epidemiological survey of Kudoa thyrsites (Myxozoa) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) from commercial aquaculture farms

Marshall, WL, Sitjà-Bobadilla, A, Brown, HM, MacWilliam, T, Richmond, Z, Lamson, J, Morrison, DB and Afonso, LOB 2016, Long-term epidemiological survey of Kudoa thyrsites (Myxozoa) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) from commercial aquaculture farms, Journal of fish diseases, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 929-946, doi: 10.1111/jfd.12429.

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Title Long-term epidemiological survey of Kudoa thyrsites (Myxozoa) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) from commercial aquaculture farms
Author(s) Marshall, WL
Sitjà-Bobadilla, A
Brown, HM
MacWilliam, T
Richmond, Z
Lamson, J
Morrison, DB
Afonso, LOB
Journal name Journal of fish diseases
Volume number 39
Issue number 8
Start page 929
End page 946
Total pages 18
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 0140-7775
1365-2761
Keyword(s) histopathology
immunity
intensity
myoliquefaction
prevalence
pseudocysts
Summary Kudoa thyrsites (Myxozoa) encysts within myocytes of a variety of fishes. While infected fish appear unharmed, parasite-derived enzymes degrade the flesh post-mortem. In regions of British Columbia (BC), Canada, up to 4-7% of fillets can be affected, thus having economic consequences and impacting the competitiveness of BC's farms. K. thyrsites was monitored in two farms having high (HP) or low (LP) historical infection prevalence. At each farm, 30 fish were sampled monthly for blood and muscle during the first year followed by nine samplings during year two. Prevalence and intensity were measured by PCR and histology of muscle samples. In parallel, fillet tests were used to quantify myoliquefaction. Infections were detected by PCR after 355 and 509 degree days at LP and HP farms, respectively. Prevalence reached 100% at the HP farm by 2265 degree days and declined during the second year, whereas it plateaued near 50% at the LP farm. Infection intensities decreased after 1 year at both farms. Blood was PCR-positive at both farms between 778 and 1113 degree days and again after 2000 degree days. This is the first monitoring project in a production environment and compares data between farms with different prevalence.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jfd.12429
Field of Research 070404 Fish Pests and Diseases
0608 Zoology
0704 Fisheries Sciences
0707 Veterinary Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 830102 Aquaculture Fin Fish (excl. Tuna)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081128

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