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Changes in the rates of weight and waist circumference gain in Australian adults over time: a longitudinal cohort study

Peeters, Anna, Magliano, Dianna J., Backholer, Kathryn, Zimmet, Paul and Shaw, Jonathan E. 2014, Changes in the rates of weight and waist circumference gain in Australian adults over time: a longitudinal cohort study, BMJ open, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003667.

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Title Changes in the rates of weight and waist circumference gain in Australian adults over time: a longitudinal cohort study
Author(s) Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Magliano, Dianna J.
Backholer, Kathryn
Zimmet, Paul
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) Cohort
Obesity
Trends
Adult
Aged
Australia
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
LIFE-STYLE
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
AUSDIAB
OVERWEIGHT
PREVALENCE
CHILDHOOD
BMI
Summary OBJECTIVE: To assess in a single cohort whether annual weight and waist circumference (WC) change has varied over time.

DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study with three surveys (1) 1999/2000; (2) 2004/2005 and (3) 2011/2012. Generalised linear mixed models with random effects were used to compare annualised weight and WC change between surveys 1 and 2 (period 1) with that between surveys 2 and 3 (period 2). Models were adjusted for age to analyse changes with time rather than age. Models were additionally adjusted for sex, education status, area-level socioeconomic disadvantage, ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes status and smoking status.

SETTING: The Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study (AusDiab)-a population-based, stratified-cluster survey of 11247 adults aged ≥25 years. PARTICIPANTS: 3351 Australian adults who attended each of three surveys and had complete measures of weight, WC and covariates.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Weight and WC were measured at each survey. Change in weight and WC was annualised for comparison between the two periods.

RESULTS: Mean weight and WC increased in both periods (0.34 kg/year, 0.43 cm/year period 1; 0.13 kg/year, 0.46 cm/year period 2). Annualised weight gain in period 2 was 0.11 kg/year (95% CI 0.06 to 0.15) less than period 1. Lesser annual weight gain between the two periods was not seen for those with greatest area-level socioeconomic disadvantage, or in men over the age of 55. In contrast, the annualised WC increase in period 2 was greater than period 1 (0.07 cm/year, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.12). The increase was greatest in men aged 55+ years and those with a greater area-level socioeconomic disadvantage.

CONCLUSIONS: Between 2004/2005 and 2011/2012, Australian adults in a national study continued to gain weight, but more slowly than 1999/2000-2004/2005. While weight gain may be slowing, this was not observed for older men or those in more disadvantaged groups, and the same cannot be said for WC.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003667
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081137

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.