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Estimating the effect of long-term physical activity on cardiovascular disease and mortality: evidence from the Framingham Heart Study

Shortreed, Susan M., Peeters, Anna and Forbes, Andrew B. 2013, Estimating the effect of long-term physical activity on cardiovascular disease and mortality: evidence from the Framingham Heart Study, Heart, vol. 99, no. 9, pp. 649-654, doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2012-303461.

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Title Estimating the effect of long-term physical activity on cardiovascular disease and mortality: evidence from the Framingham Heart Study
Author(s) Shortreed, Susan M.
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Forbes, Andrew B.
Journal name Heart
Volume number 99
Issue number 9
Start page 649
End page 654
Total pages 8
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-05
ISSN 1468-201X
Keyword(s) Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cohort Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Sedentary Lifestyle
Sex Factors
United States
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
MARGINAL STRUCTURAL MODELS
ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY
LEISURE-TIME
FOLLOW-UP
MEN
WOMEN
RISK
EPIDEMIOLOGY
ASSOCIATION
BENEFITS
Summary OBJECTIVE: In the majority of studies, the effect of physical activity (PA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality is estimated at a single time point. The impact of long-term PA is likely to differ. Our study objective was to estimate the effect of long-term adult-life PA compared with long-term inactivity on the risk of incident CVD, all-cause mortality and CVD-attributable mortality. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Framingham, MA, USA. PATIENTS: 4729 Framingham Heart Study participants who were alive and CVD-free in 1956. EXPOSURES: PA was measured at three visits over 30 years along with a variety of risk factors for CVD. Cumulative PA was defined as long-term active versus long-term inactive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incident CVD, all-cause mortality and CVD-attributable mortality. RESULTS: During 40 years of follow-up there were 2594 cases of incident CVD, 1313 CVD-attributable deaths and 3521 deaths. Compared with long-term physical inactivity, the rate ratio of long-term PA was 0.95 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.07) for CVD, 0.81 (0.71 to 0.93) for all-cause mortality and 0.83 (0.72 to 0.97) for CVD-attributable mortality. Assessment of effect modification by sex suggests greater protective effect of long-term PA on CVD incidence (p value for interaction=0.004) in men (0.79 (0.66 to 0.93)) than in women (1.15 (0.97 to 1.37)). CONCLUSIONS: Cumulative long-term PA has a protective effect on incidence of all-cause and CVD-attributable mortality compared with long-term physical inactivity. In men, but not women, long-term PA also appears to have a protective effect on incidence of CVD.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/heartjnl-2012-303461
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, BMJ Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081142

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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