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A systematic review of the impact of weight loss on cancer incidence and mortality

Birks, S., Peeters, A., Backholer, K., O'Brien, P. and Brown, W. 2012, A systematic review of the impact of weight loss on cancer incidence and mortality, Obesity reviews, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 868-891, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01010.x.

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Title A systematic review of the impact of weight loss on cancer incidence and mortality
Author(s) Birks, S.
Peeters, A.ORCID iD for Peeters, A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Backholer, K.ORCID iD for Backholer, K. orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
O'Brien, P.
Brown, W.
Journal name Obesity reviews
Volume number 13
Issue number 10
Start page 868
End page 891
Total pages 24
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2012-10
ISSN 1467-789X
Keyword(s) Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms
Obesity
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Weight Loss
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Cancer
POSTMENOPAUSAL BREAST-CANCER
BODY-MASS INDEX
IOWA WOMENS HEALTH
MORBIDLY OBESE-PATIENTS
LONG-TERM MORTALITY
GASTRIC BYPASS-SURGERY
AGED 40-64 YEARS
BARIATRIC SURGERY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS
Summary Obesity is well recognized as a significant risk factor for certain cancers; however, a corresponding risk reduction with weight loss is not yet clearly defined. This review aims to examine the literature investigating the effect of all types of weight loss on cancer incidence and mortality, and to more clearly describe the relationship between these two factors. A literature search identified 34 publications reporting weight loss data in relation to cancer incidence or mortality. All except one were observational studies and the majority used self-reported weights and did not define intentionality of weight loss. 16/34 studies found a significant inverse association between weight loss and cancer incidence or mortality. The remainder returned null findings. The observed association was more consistently seen in studies that investigated the effect of intentional weight loss (5/6 studies) and the risk reduction was greatest for obesity-related cancers and in women. In conclusion, intentional weight loss does result in a decreased incidence of cancer, particularly female obesity-related cancers. However, there is a need for further evaluation of sustained intentional weight loss in the obese with less reliance on self-reported weight data and more focus on male populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01010.x
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, International Association for the Study of Obesity
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081151

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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