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Daily step-count and change in waist circumference during a workplace pedometer program

Backholer, Kathryn, Freak-Poli, Rosanne and Peeters, Anna 2012, Daily step-count and change in waist circumference during a workplace pedometer program, Open journal of preventive medicine, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 249-256, doi: 10.4236/ojpm.2012.22036.

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Title Daily step-count and change in waist circumference during a workplace pedometer program
Author(s) Backholer, Kathryn
Freak-Poli, Rosanne
Peeters, Anna
Journal name Open journal of preventive medicine
Volume number 2
Issue number 2
Start page 249
End page 256
Total pages 8
Publisher Scientific Research Publishing
Place of publication Irvine, Calif.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 2162-2477
2162-2485
Summary Background: The health benefit associated with a daily step-count target within pedometer pro- grams is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine if the daily step-count attained during a four month pedometer-based workplace health program was associated with change in waist circumference (WC).

Methods: 762 Australian adults enrolled in a workplace pedometer pro- gram were recruited from ten workplaces in 2008. At the end of the program (four months), 436 participants were eligible for the current analysis. Data included demographics, perceived physical activity change during the program, measured WC at baseline and follow-up, and reported daily pedometer step-counts throughout the program. The association between daily step count and change in WC was examined using linear re- gression.

Results: WC improved by an average of –1.61cm (95% CI: –2.13, –1.09) by the end of the program. There was no relationship between daily step-count and the degree of change in WC. However, among participants reporting an in- crease in physical activity during the program a relationship between daily step count and change in WC was observed, such that those who un-dertook on average 10,000 steps or more per day improved their WC by –1.38cm (95%CI: –2.14, –0.63) more than those who did not achieve an average of 10,000 steps per day. Similarly, among individuals not meeting WC guidelines at baseline a greater daily step count was associ-ated with a greater decrease in WC.

Conclusions: Within a workplace pedometer program, reported daily step count was not associated with greater reductions in WC. However, it was a useful in-dicator of potential health benefits in those who increased their level of physical activity during the program. Pedometer programs need to com- municate clearly the importance of both a step goal and improvement in step count to manage participant expectations about improvements in health markers.
Language eng
DOI 10.4236/ojpm.2012.22036
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, SciRes
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081152

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.