Trends in the skewness of the body mass index distribution among urban Australian adults, 1980 to 2007

Peeters, Anna, Gearon, Emma, Backholer, Kathryn and Carstensen, Bendix 2015, Trends in the skewness of the body mass index distribution among urban Australian adults, 1980 to 2007, Annals of epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 26-33, doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2014.10.008.

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Title Trends in the skewness of the body mass index distribution among urban Australian adults, 1980 to 2007
Author(s) Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Gearon, Emma
Backholer, KathrynORCID iD for Backholer, Kathryn orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Carstensen, Bendix
Journal name Annals of epidemiology
Volume number 25
Issue number 1
Start page 26
End page 33
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 1047-2797
Keyword(s) body mass index
trends
obesity
Summary Purpose We analyzed the changes in the body mass index (BMI) distribution for urban Australian adults between 1980 and 2007.

Methods We used data from participants of six consecutive Australian nation-wide surveys with measured weight and height between 1980 and 2007. We used quantile regression to estimate mean BMI (for percentiles of BMI) and prevalence of severe obesity, modeled by natural splines in age, date of birth, and survey date.

Results Since 1980, the right skew in the BMI distribution for Australian adults has increased greatly for men and women, driven by increases in skew associated with age and birth cohort/period. Between 1980 and 2007, the average 5-year increase in BMI was 1 kg/m2 (0.8) for the 95th percentile of BMI in women (men). The increase in the median was about a third of this, and for the 10th percentile, a fifth of this. We estimated that for the cohort born in 1960 around 31% of men and women were obese by age 50 years compared with 11% of the 1930 birth cohort.

Conclusions There have been large increases in the right skew of the BMI distribution for urban Australian adults between 1980 and 2007, and birth cohort effects suggests similar increases are likely to continue.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.annepidem.2014.10.008
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081163

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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