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Delivering mental health first aid training in Australian workplaces: exploring instructors' experiences

Bovopoulos, Nataly, LaMontagne, Anthony, Martin, Angela and Jorm, Anthony 2016, Delivering mental health first aid training in Australian workplaces: exploring instructors' experiences, International journal of mental health promotion, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 65-82, doi: 10.1080/14623730.2015.1122658.

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Title Delivering mental health first aid training in Australian workplaces: exploring instructors' experiences
Author(s) Bovopoulos, Nataly
LaMontagne, AnthonyORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Martin, Angela
Jorm, Anthony
Journal name International journal of mental health promotion
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Start page 65
End page 82
Total pages 18
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1462-3730
2049-8543
Keyword(s) mental health first aid
workplaces
instructors
mental health literacy
mental illness
Summary  The impact of common mental illnesses in the workplace can be reduced by encouraging support from co-workers and promoting early professional help-seeking. The Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) course is an evidence-based effective program designed to encourage social support and early help-seeking in the general community. However, little is known about whether the course meets the needs of workplaces. The current study aimed to gain a better understanding of how the course is being delivered in Australian workplaces and invite feedback on how it could be tailored for this delivery setting. This study used a purpose-designed survey to explore 120 MHFA instructors’ experiences of delivering the course in workplaces. The results indicated that MHFA is most commonly deployed in the human service and education sectors to assist workers with helping clients, rather than helping co-workers. The results also suggest ways in which the MHFA course could be tailored for workplaces, as well as further support instructors require to deliver courses in workplace settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/14623730.2015.1122658
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Clifford Beers Foundation
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-03-17
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081244

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.