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Behaviour change strategies for reducing blood pressure-related disease burden: findings from a global implementation research programme

Peiris, David, Thompson, Simon R., Beratarrechea, Andrea, Cárdenas, Maria Kathia, Diez-Canseco, Francisco, Goudge, Jane, Gyamfi, Joyce, Kamano, Jemima Hoine, Irazola, Vilma, Johnson, Claire, Kengne, Andre P., Keat, Ng Kien, Miranda, J. Jaime, Mohan, Sailesh, Mukasa, Barbara, Ng, Eleanor, Moodie, Marj, Nowson, Caryl, Snowdon, Wendy and GACD Hypertension Research Programme Writing Group 2015, Behaviour change strategies for reducing blood pressure-related disease burden: findings from a global implementation research programme, Implementation science, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s13012-015-0331-0.

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Title Behaviour change strategies for reducing blood pressure-related disease burden: findings from a global implementation research programme
Author(s) Peiris, David
Thompson, Simon R.
Beratarrechea, Andrea
Cárdenas, Maria Kathia
Diez-Canseco, Francisco
Goudge, Jane
Gyamfi, Joyce
Kamano, Jemima Hoine
Irazola, Vilma
Johnson, Claire
Kengne, Andre P.
Keat, Ng Kien
Miranda, J. Jaime
Mohan, Sailesh
Mukasa, Barbara
Ng, Eleanor
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Snowdon, Wendy
GACD Hypertension Research Programme Writing Group
Journal name Implementation science
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 158
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-11-09
ISSN 1748-5908
Keyword(s) implementation science
hypertension
behaviour change theory
collaborative research
low-andmiddle-income countries
Summary Background: The Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases comprises the majority of the world’s public researchfunding agencies. It is focussed on implementation research to tackle the burden of chronic diseases inlow- and middle-income countries and amongst vulnerable populations in high-income countries. In itsinaugural research call, 15 projects were funded, focussing on lowering blood pressure-related diseaseburden. In this study, we describe a reflexive mapping exercise to identify the behaviour change strategiesundertaken in each of these projects.

Methods:
Using the Behaviour Change Wheel framework, each team rated the capability, opportunity andmotivation of the various actors who were integral to each project (e.g. community members, non-physicianhealth workers and doctors in projects focussed on service delivery). Teams then mapped the interventionsthey were implementing and determined the principal policy categories in which those interventions wereoperating. Guidance was provided on the use of Behaviour Change Wheel to support consistency inresponses across teams. Ratings were iteratively discussed and refined at several group meetings.

Results: There was marked variation in the perceived capabilities, opportunities and motivation of the variousactors who were being targeted for behaviour change strategies. Despite this variation, there was a highdegree of synergy in interventions functions with most teams utilising complex interventions involvingeducation, training, enablement, environmental restructuring and persuasion oriented strategies. Similar policycategories were also targeted across teams particularly in the areas of guidelines, communication/marketingand service provision with few teams focussing on fiscal measures, regulation and legislation.

Conclusions: The large variation in preparedness to change behaviour amongst the principal actors across theseprojects suggests that the interventions themselves will be variably taken up, despite the similarity in approaches taken.The findings highlight the importance of contextual factors in driving success and failure of research programmes.Forthcoming outcome and process evaluations from each project will build on this exploratory work and provide agreater understanding of factors that might influence scale-up of intervention strategies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0331-0
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
08 Information And Computing Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081309

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.