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Identifying educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare for mental health practice in Australia and New Zealand: opinions of practising occupational therapists

Scanlan, Justin Newton, Pépin, Genevieve, Haracz, Kirsti, Ennals, Priscilla, Webster, Jayne S., Meredith, Pamela J., Batten, Rachel, Bowman, Siann, Bonassi, Marianne and Bruce, Rosie 2015, Identifying educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare for mental health practice in Australia and New Zealand: opinions of practising occupational therapists, Australian occupational therapy journal, vol. 62, no. 5, Special issue : Mental health and occupational therapy, pp. 286-298, doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12194.

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Title Identifying educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare for mental health practice in Australia and New Zealand: opinions of practising occupational therapists
Author(s) Scanlan, Justin Newton
Pépin, Genevieve
Haracz, Kirsti
Ennals, Priscilla
Webster, Jayne S.
Meredith, Pamela J.
Batten, Rachel
Bowman, Siann
Bonassi, Marianne
Bruce, Rosie
Journal name Australian occupational therapy journal
Volume number 62
Issue number 5
Season Special issue : Mental health and occupational therapy
Start page 286
End page 298
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-10
ISSN 1440-1630
0045-0766
Keyword(s) Delphi technique
mental health
occupational therapy process/competency standards
occupational therapy professional attitudes and behaviours
students
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Rehabilitation
TURNOVER INTENTION
RETENTION ISSUES
WORKING
RECRUITMENT
CURRICULUM
BURNOUT
Summary BACKGROUND: The effective preparation of occupational therapy students for mental health practice is critical to facilitate positive consumer outcomes, underpin optimal practice and support new graduates' professional identity. This project was established to determine a set of 'educational priorities' for occupational therapy students to prepare them for current (and future) entry-level practice in mental health, from the perspective of mental health occupational therapists in Australia and New Zealand. METHODS: The study included two phases. In Phase One, participants identified what they considered to be important educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare them for practice in mental health. For Phase Two, an 'expert panel' was assembled to review and rank these using a Policy Delphi approach. RESULTS: Eighty-five participants provided educational priorities in Phase One. These were grouped into a total of 149 educational themes. In Phase Two, the expert panel (consisting of 37 occupational therapists from diverse locations and practice settings) prioritised these themes across three Delphi rounds. A final priority list was generated dividing educational themes into three prioritised categories: 29 'Essential', 25 'Important' and 44 'Optional' priorities. Highest-ranked priorities were: clinical reasoning, client-centred practice, therapeutic use of self, functional implications of mental illness, therapeutic use of occupation and mental health fieldwork experience. CONCLUSION: The priority list developed as part of this project provides additional information to support the review of occupational therapy curricula across Australia and New Zealand to ensure that new graduates are optimally prepared for mental health practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12194
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Occupational Therapy Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081321

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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