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Salt intakes, knowledge, and behavior in Samoa: monitoring salt-consumption patterns through the World Health Organization's Surveillance of Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors (STEPS)

Webster, Jacqui, Su'a, Sarah Asi Faletoese, Ieremia, Merenia, Bompoint, Severine, Johnson, Claire, Faeamani, Gavin, Vaiaso, Miraneta, Snowdon, Wendy, Land, Mary-Anne, Trieu, Kathy, Viali, Satu, Moodie, Marj, Bell, Colin, Neal, Bruce and Woodward, Mark 2016, Salt intakes, knowledge, and behavior in Samoa: monitoring salt-consumption patterns through the World Health Organization's Surveillance of Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors (STEPS), Journal of clinical hypertension, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 884-891, doi: 10.1111/jch.12778.

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Title Salt intakes, knowledge, and behavior in Samoa: monitoring salt-consumption patterns through the World Health Organization's Surveillance of Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors (STEPS)
Author(s) Webster, Jacqui
Su'a, Sarah Asi Faletoese
Ieremia, Merenia
Bompoint, Severine
Johnson, Claire
Faeamani, Gavin
Vaiaso, Miraneta
Snowdon, Wendy
Land, Mary-Anne
Trieu, Kathy
Viali, Satu
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Bell, ColinORCID iD for Bell, Colin orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Neal, Bruce
Woodward, Mark
Journal name Journal of clinical hypertension
Volume number 18
Issue number 9
Start page 884
End page 891
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2016-09
ISSN 1524-6175
1751-7176
Summary This project measured population salt intake in Samoa by integrating urinary sodium analysis into the World Health Organization's (WHO's) STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable disease risk factors (STEPS). A subsample of the Samoan Ministry of Health's 2013 STEPS Survey collected 24-hour and spot urine samples and completed questions on salt-related behaviors. Complete urine samples were available for 293 participants. Overall, weighted mean population 24-hour urine excretion of salt was 7.09 g (standard error 0.19) to 7.63 g (standard error 0.27) for men and 6.39 g (standard error 0.14) for women (P=.0014). Salt intake increased with body mass index (P=.0004), and people who added salt at the table had 1.5 g higher salt intakes than those who did not add salt (P=.0422). A total of 70% of the population had urinary excretion values above the 5 g/d cutoff recommended by the WHO. A reduction of 30% (2 g) would reduce average population salt intake to 5 g/d, in line with WHO recommendations. While challenging, integration of salt monitoring into STEPS provides clear logistical and cost benefits and the lessons communicated here can help inform future programs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jch.12778
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
1101 Medical Biochemistry And Metabolomics
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081351

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.